Why Heroin and Classroom Sex Aren’t Enough to Get Teachers Fired Anymore 

“But the legal system seems bent on protecting the rights of teachers to extraordinary degrees and leaves the students vulnerable.”

The controversial “conscience’’ standard has been around since the 1970s, when it was established by the state’s highest court.

The Court of Appeals wrote in Pell v. Board of Education that judges should typically defer to education officials because they are ultimately responsible for their 77,000 employees.

For decades, the ruling meant that judges rarely second-guessed DOE arbitrators’ disciplinary rulings. But experts, citing several overturned high-profile cases in recent years, say that way of thinking is rapidly changing.

For example, trial and appeals courts alike found it “shocking” that a Brooklyn high school teacher was canned for bringing heroin to court in a backpack.

The courts also were “shocked’’ at the firing of two female romance-language teachers over a topless tryst in a classroom.

Last month, the city was forced to appeal a court ruling that sent a Queens elementary school teacher back into the classroom even after she flunked three of her four previous performance ratings. Read the rest of this entry »


The New Nationwide Crime Wave

Unrest: Some of the groups Soros funded came up with slogans and social media campaigns to keep the event in the national consciousness

The consequences of the ‘Ferguson effect’ are already appearing. The main victims of growing violence will be the inner-city poor

Heather Mac Donald writes: The nation’s two-decades-long crime decline may be over. Gun violence in particular is spiraling upward in cities across America. In Baltimore, the most pressing question every 51rlOPaxdUL._SL250_morning is how many people were shot the previous night.

[Heather Mac Donald is the author of “Are Cops Racist?“, available at Amazon.com]

Gun violence is up more than 60% compared with this time last year, according to Baltimore police, with 32 shootings over Memorial Day weekend. May has been the most violent month the city has seen in 15 years.

“President Obama and Attorney General Eric Holder, before he stepped down last month, embraced the conceit that law enforcement in black communities is infected by bias.”

Murders in Atlanta were up 32% as of mid-May. Shootings in Chicago had increased 24% and homicides 17%. Shootings and other violent felonies in Los Angeles had spiked by 25%; in New York, murder was up nearly 13%, and gun violence 7%.

APTOPIX Police Shooting Missouri

“Contrary to the claims of the ‘black lives matter’ movement, no government policy in the past quarter century has done more for urban reclamation than proactive policing. Data-driven enforcement, in conjunction with stricter penalties for criminals and ‘broken windows’  policing  has saved thousands of black lives, brought lawful commerce and jobs to once drug-infested neighborhoods and allowed millions to go about their daily lives without fear.”

Those citywide statistics from law-enforcement officials mask even more startling neighborhood-level increases. Shooting incidents are up 500% in an East Harlem precinct compared with last year; in a South Central Los Angeles police division, shooting victims are up 100%.

“Murders in Atlanta were up 32% as of mid-May. Shootings in Chicago had increased 24% and homicides 17%. Shootings and other violent felonies in Los Angeles had spiked by 25%; in New York, murder was up nearly 13%, and gun violence 7%.”

By contrast, the first six months of 2014 continued a 20-year pattern of growing public safety. Violent crime in the first half of last year dropped 4.6% nationally and property crime was down 7.5%. Though comparable national figures for the first half of 2015 won’t be available for another year, the January through June 2014 crime decline is unlikely to be repeated.

“Since last summer, the airwaves have been dominated by suggestions that the police are the biggest threat facing young black males today.”

The most plausible explanation of the current surge in lawlessness is the intense agitation against American police departments over the past nine months. Read the rest of this entry »


Who Should Pay for the Arts?

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Private support beats public subsidies

Jared Meyer writes:   Should the federal government subsidize the arts? Dancer Nora Younkin thinks so. In the Huffington Post recently, she argued that the societal benefits of arts such as dance are not only cultural and educational, but economic as well. “It is well documented that dance and the arts generate revenue for local economies,” she wrote. “The performing arts also create jobs. And I don’t mean just the jobs of dancemakers and performers. The technical crew, the artistic collaborators, the venues, the technical equipment rentals or purchases, the restaurant down the street from the venue, even the taxi driver that got you to a performance. Those are all real jobs from which people take home a paycheck and go on to spend buying groceries or clothes.” But assuming that all federal funding reaches struggling artists—and that art subsidies indeed “trickle down” to a local economy—is a mistake.

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Experts Fear Health Care Insurance Rate ‘Death Spiral’

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New Yorkers will pay less than they used to for individual health insurance under ObamaCare — but they better not get used to it, because steep increases are on the way and the choice of doctors will be limited, critics warn.

While health-insurance costs will balloon around the country under the Affordable Care Act, an unusual legal situation in the Empire State will lower prices when the markets for President Obama’s signature legislative achievement open on Tuesday.

Everyone who doesn’t already have a medical policy — through work, Medicare or otherwise — will have to buy a policy or face fines once ObamaCare begins.

In New York, the new presidential plans can be had for an average of 29 percent less than old individual policies — $356 a month, compared with $500 — experts at the Manhattan Institute for Policy Research predict. Read the rest of this entry »