Advertisements

OH YES SHE DID: Meryl Streep Targeted by Street Artists With ‘She Knew’ Posters

The posters appeared in several locations in Los Angeles.

In posters that appeared in several locations in Los Angeles on Tuesday, Meryl Streep was seemingly depicted as a Harvey Weinstein enabler by anonymous street artists.

she_knew_embed.jpg

Posters hung early in the morning, before the sun came up, feature an image of Streep next to Weinstein with a red strip across her face with the text “She knew,” an apparent reference to Weinstein’s alleged sexual abuse of women over the course of decades.

The posters are a riff on the work of artist Barbara Kruger, whose signature text in red banners has been adapted and copied for decades.

unnamed-embed_1 Read the rest of this entry »

Advertisements

[VIDEO] Best Political Speech by an Entertainment Celebrity: Who Will Win? 

Forget the Oscars, the Golden Globes, and the Emmys: the stars are all out for the Hollywood Awards. But who will take home the prize for Best Political Speech by an Entertainment Celebrity?

streep.jpg

Written and produced by Austin Bragg. Performed by Andrew Heaton and Austin Bragg

 

 


Movie Critic on Obama Farewell: ‘I Want to Grab His Pant Leg and Tell Him Not to Go!

dog-biting-pant-leg-joey43
Tim Graham reports: Movie critic Frank Scheck of The Hollywood Reporter offered a rave review of President Obama’s farewell address on Tuesday night, hailing it in the headline as “One Last Reminder of What Presidential Looks Like.” Donald Trump is all “schoolyard taunts” for white people in “silly hats,” while Obama is so terrific that “Watching him walk off the stage made you feel like a child desperately holding onto a father’s pants [sic] legs to try to prevent him from leaving the house.”
chris-matthews

“I know exactly how you feel.”

…This sounds like a parody of media fawning over Obama….but then so does so much of the Obama-loving media. But the line about grabbing on to Obama’s pant leg is just priceless:

“I’m more optimistic than when we started,” declared Obama, and it was then that you fully realized that he was transitioning from commander in chief to therapist in chief.

“It has been the honor of my life to serve you. … I won’t stop,” he assured us, invoking the slogan that accompanied his ascendancy to the presidency: “Yes we can.” Except this time, he added, “Yes we did.” Read the rest of this entry »


What Donald Trump Should Have Tweeted

trump-tweet-shoulda

It would have A. driven his opponents, haters, and enemies crazy. What did he mean? Is that all? What will Meryl Streep say now?  Better still, it would have neutralized the controversy, tempered the division, honored her contribution to entertainment, confirmed that both of them are winners, while demonstrating non-newsworthy, off-the-rack, standard-issue presidential courtesy.

Win-win.

 


Answer: Who Cares?

streep-who-cares


Critic’s Notebook: Todd McCarthy Reflects on the Film Career of Mike Nichols

nichols

Todd McCarthy writes: Mike Nichols is such a great talker, my first desire after reading The Hollywood Reporter’s current skipping-stone account of his theatrical directing career is to buy his own 20-disc recording of the autobiography he unfortunately hasn’t written yet.

My second desire is to see Death of a Salesman before it closes.

My third is to know: Who is Mike Nichols?

As Meryl Streep attests, he always is “the smartest and most brilliant person in the room.” I spent a couple of hours with him many years ago, a memorable encounter that directly led to my first job in Hollywood — as assistant to his former partner, Elaine May. At the time, Nichols was preparing to direct the film version of The Last Tycoon, a project that eventually passed to his self-proclaimed idol, Elia Kazan, while Nichols moved on to The Fortune. This sequence of events didn’t work out well for either of them; it was the end for Kazan, and Nichols didn’t direct another dramatic feature for nearly a decade.

mike_nichols_a_l

Nichols’ best films, in order:

ANGELS IN AMERICA (2003) Nichols’ distinct talents for stage and screen merge perfectly in this superlative adaptation of one of the great American epic plays. Jeffrey Wright and Al Pacino are out of this world in it.

CARNAL KNOWLEDGE (1971) With a terrific Jules Feiffer script (originally written as a play) and a bold visual style, this bracing study of men’s attitudes toward women is probably the director’s most probing, self-revelatory film.

THE GRADUATE (1967) Still funny and sharp-edged after all these years, it’s one of the great zeitgeist films of the ‘60s or any other era, caricatured, perhaps, but with truth and insight to support it. Dustin Hoffman and Anne Bancroft are simply sensational.

WHO’S AFRAID OF VIRGINIA WOOLF? (1966) Richard Burton remains the standout in Nichols’ vibrant and vital adaptation of one of the seminal American plays, with Haskell Wexler’s mobile, unflattering black-and-white cinematography still a marvel.

WORKING GIRL (1988) This key female empowerment comedy is sheer enjoyment, plain and simple, with Nichols displaying his great skill with actors by making everyone in the variously talented cast look equally good.

And therein lies the first mystery. Why did this golden boy, who had conquered improv, recording, cabaret and Broadway by his early 30s, won an Oscar for his second film and batted .750 in his first four times up to the plate — with Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?The Graduate and Carnal Knowledge all going for extra bases while Catch-22 was a deep fly out to left — suddenly flatline, lose “The Knack” (also the title of a play he successfully directed in the early 1960s) and retreat to Broadway? Read the rest of this entry »


Weinstein: “I don’t think we need guns in this country. And I hate it. I think the NRA is a disaster area…”

weinsteinWeinstein Update: Over at HotAirEd Morrissey has comments:

Congratulations, genius. You’re setting out to make a movie that will annoy more than 60 million Americans who responsibly own firearms.  What a great marketing strategy that will be! Why, this new project will take … the same oh-so-courageous-and-tediously-didactic path as the anti-war films Lions for Lambs and Rendition, two films which bombed at the box office in 2007, both of which also starred … Meryl Streep.

 “I’m making a movie that the NRA will hate…”

— Weinstein

Let’s muse on the irony, though, of Harvey Weinstein making this declaration. How much gunfire went into Pulp Fiction, which he exec-produced? The 2008 Rambo sequel? Jackie Brown?

Read the rest of this entry »