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[VIDEO] All About The Mahavishnu Orchestra with author Walter Kolosky

Meet Walter Kolosky, author of “The Mahavishnu Orchestra Picture Book.” Walter has written three books about the Mahavishnu Orchestra and we’ discuss the history of John McLaughlin’s group.

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To buy the iBook go to https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/maha…

To buy the Kindle Book go to https://www.amazon.com/Mahavishnu-Orc…

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[VIDEO] Conversations with John McLaughlin

NYU Steinhardt Jazz Interview Series with Dr. David Schroeder interviews legendary guitarist, composer and bandleader John McLaughlin. December 5, 2016

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[VIDEO] ‘You Know, You Know’, John McLaughlin & Chick Corea at the Blue Note in NYC, December 8, 2016

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New Photos of John Coltrane Rediscovered 50 Years After They Were Shot

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During the recording of A Love Supreme in 1964, Chuck Stewart caught the jazz legend in his element.

Nelson George writes: On December 9, 1964, saxophonist John Coltrane led a quartet that featured pianist McCoy Tyner, drummer Elvin Jones and bassist Jimmy Garrison into Rudy Van Gelder’s studio in Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, where countless jazz recording sessions were held in the 1950s and ’60s. For photographer Chuck Stewart, Van Gelder’s was a short drive from his home in Teaneck.

[See the exclusive photos here, at Smithsonianmag.com]

That day nearly 50 years ago the band recorded a Coltrane composition titled A Love Supreme, a profound expression of his spiritual awakening divided into four movements—“Acknowledgement,” “Resolution,” “Pursuance,” “Psalm.” For its soaring ambition, flawless execution and raw power, it was hailed as a groundbreaking piece of music when it was released in February 1965, and it has endured as a seminal part of the jazz canon. The work and its composer will be highlighted anew this April during Jazz Appreciation Month, an annual event launched in 2001 by the National Museum of American History, whose collection includes Coltrane’s original manuscript for A Love Supreme.

“I couldn’t shoot during the take because the recording equipment would pick up the clicks. So what I did was meander around the studio. When I saw a picture I thought worked, I’d take it.”

— Photographer Chuck Stewart

For Stewart, whose photographs have graced thousands of album covers, from Ellington to Davis, from Basie to Armstrong, that session with Coltrane—a friend of his since 1949—was no different from countless others. “When I did a session I would go in and shoot the rehearsal before they did any takes,” the 86-year-old photographer recalls, sitting in his cozy, picture-filled living room in Teaneck. “I couldn’t shoot during the take because the recording equipment would pick up the clicks. So what I did was meander around the studio. When I saw a picture I thought worked, I’d take it.”

[Read the full story here, at Smithsonianmag.com]

Stewart still has the Rolleiflex camera he used at the session, and the contact sheets as well. Many of the images he shot have been seen on CDs, as well as in numerous books and magazine articles. But 72 photographs from six rolls of film never made it beyond the contact-sheet stage, and so haven’t been published. Stewart’s son David recently rediscovered those images in his father’s collection, and now Stewart is scheduled to include some of them in a donation to the museum this month. Read the rest of this entry »


Miles Davis: Photo by David Redfern

Source: Jazzyzin


[VIDEO] MILES AHEAD (2016) – HD Preview 

MILES AHEAD is a wildly entertaining and moving exploration of one of 20th century music’s creative geniuses, Miles Davis, featuring a career defining performance by Oscar nominee Don Cheadle in the title role. Working from a script he co-wrote with Steven Baigelman, Cheadle’s bravura directorial debut is not a conventional bio-pic but rather a unique, no-holds barred portrait of a singular artist in crisis.

[Official Miles Ahead Soundtrack: iTunes –Amazon]

In the midst of a dazzling and prolific career at the forefront of modern jazz innovation, Miles Davis (Cheadle) virtually disappears from public view for a period of five years in the late 1970s. Alone and holed up in his home, he is beset by chronic pain from a deteriorating hip, his musical voice stifled and numbed by drugs and pain medications, his mind haunted by unsettling ghosts from the past.


[VIDEO] Miles Davis and Cicely Tyson Celebrate Davis’ 60th Birthday, 1986

Miles Davis and Cicely Tyson celebrate Davis’s 60th birthday, 1986

Jazz musician Miles Davis affectionately wraps his arm around Cicely Tyson as they celebrate Davis’s 60th birthday. (Isaac Sutton/ EBONY Collection)


[PHOTO] Miles Davis

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Miles Davis was the best-dressed man of the 20th century. Starting out, he’d customise his pawnshop Brooks Brothers suits, cutting notches in the lapels in imitation of the Duke of Windsor. After 1949’s Birth of the Cool, he favoured the Ivy League look of European tailoring. In the 60s he went for slim-cut Italian suits and handmade doeskin loafers. He was always the coolest-looking man in the room. Hell, he even managed to look cool sporting a blood-splattered white khaki jacket following a scuffle with police outside Birdland. In the 70s his wardrobe went as far-gone funky as his music and he was the only man who could get away with wearing purple bell bottoms, kipper ties and hexagonal glasses.


[PHOTO] Miles Davis by Guy Le Querrec

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Carlos Santana Talks Reuniting Santana IV, New Band With Wayne Shorter, John McLaughlin & Herbie Hancock

 reports: Carlos Santana is getting closer to the finishing the Santana IV project, which reunites members of the 1971-72 lineup of the band. But that’s not the only band he plans to launch in 2015.

“Definitely spring recording and summer touring in Europe and maybe America. Can you hear it? It’s kind of like playing with, sharing music with Albert Einstein and Stephen Hawking, ’cause Wayne and Herbie, they’re at that level of genius, genius, genius, genius.”

The guitar legend tells Billboard that he and his wife Cindy Blackman Santana are forming a jazz fusion group called Supernova that will also include saxophonist Wayne Shorter, keyboardist Herbie Hancock and guitarist John McLaughlin.

“I’m just grateful that they accept it and want to do it. And every time I play with Cindy, it goes viral. People go crazy. The energy between Cindy and I is very, very supernova.”

“Definitely spring recording and summer touring in Europe and maybe America,” Santana says of their plans. “Can you hear it? It’s kind of like playing with, sharing music with Albert Einstein and Stephen Hawking, ’cause Wayne and Herbie, they’re at that level of genius, genius, genius, genius. I’m just grateful that they accept it and want to do it. And every time I play with Cindy, it goes viral. People go crazy. The energy between Cindy and I is very, very supernova.”

[Read the full story here, at Billboard]

That said, Santana acknowledges being a bit skeptical as to how well a group like Supernova will play in his homeland. “America is still into ‘Tutti Frutti’ and that kind of stuff,” he says. Read the rest of this entry »


[PHOTO] Miles at Newport, 1955

Miles at Newport, 1955


[PHOTO] Miles Davis and Ron Carter, 1967

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Ron Carter came to fame via the second great Miles Davis Quintet in the early 1960′s, which also included Herbie Hancock, Wayne Shorter and Tony Williams. Carter joined Davis’s group in 1963, appearing on the album Seven Steps to Heaven and the follow-up E.S.P., the latter being the first album to feature only the full quintet. It also featured three of Carter’s compositions (the only time he contributed compositions to Davis’s group). He stayed with Davis until 1968 (when he was replaced by Dave Holland), and participated in a couple of studio sessions with Davis in 1969 and 1970.


Miles Davis Statue in Kielce, Poland

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Miles Dewey Davis III (May 26, 1926 – September 28, 1991) – Happy Birthday Miles!

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[PHOTO] Miles Davis with Camera

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[PHOTO] Miles Davis, by Anton Corbijn

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Miles Davis autographed pic. Photo by Anton Corbijn


The Prince Of Darkness: Miles Davis, 1958

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[PHOTO] Miles Davis

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[PHOTO] Miles Davis

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Herbie Hancock and Miles Davis, Amsterdam 1964

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[AUDIO] Miles Davis: ‘Darn That Dream’

“Darn That Dream” by Gerry Mulligan

 


[PHOTO] Stan Getz and Miles Davis, 1951

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[AUDIO] Miles Davis: ‘Ascenseur pour l’échafaud’ (Lift to the Scaffold) Soundtrack 1958

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Ascenseur pour l’échafaud” = “Lift to the Scaffold

[Order Ascenseur Pour L’Echafaud (Lift To The Scaffold): Original Soundtrack from Amazon.com]

Miles Davis – Ascenseur pour l’échafaud (Fontana) 1958

Miles Davis – trumpet

Barney Wilson – tenor saxophone

René Urtreger – piano

Pierre Michelot – bass

Kenny Clarke – drums

“This recording can stand proudly alongside Duke Ellington’s music from Anatomy of a Murder and the soundtrack of Play Misty for Me as great achievements of artistic excellence in fusing dramatic scenes with equally compelling modern jazz music”

buriedbones1963  Diary Of A Radical Conformist – YouTube


[AUDIO] Friday Night Jazz: Miles Davis’ ‘Seven Steps To Heaven,’ 1963 – Full Album

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Hat tip/Paulo Ricardo

  • Miles Davis – trumpet
  • George Coleman – tenor saxophone on “Seven Steps to Heaven”, “So Near So Far”, “Joshua”
  • Victor Feldman – piano on “Basin Street Blues”, “I Fall in Love Too Easily”, “Baby Won’t You Please Come Home”, “So Near So Far” (alternative), “Summer Night”
  • Herbie Hancock – piano on “Seven Steps to Heaven”, “So Near So Far” (master), “Joshua”
  • Ron Carter – bass
  • Frank Butler – drums on “Basin Street Blues”, “I Fall in Love Too Easily”, “Baby Won’t You Please Come Home”, “So Near So Far” (alternative), “Summer Night”
  • Tony Williams – drums on “Seven Steps to Heaven,” “So Near So Far” (master), “Joshua”

Background

After the unfinished sessions for Quiet Nights in 1962, Davis returned to club work. However, he had a series of health problems in 1962, which made his live dates inconsistent and meant that he missed gigs, with financial repercussions. Faced with diminishing returns, by late 1962 his entire band quit, Hank Mobley to a solo career, and the rhythm section of Wynton KellyPaul Chambers, and Jimmy Cobb to work as a unit. The departure of Chambers especially was a blow, as he had been the only man still left from the original formation of the quintet in 1955, the only one never replaced.

With club dates to fulfill, Davis hired several musicians to fill in: Frank Strozier on alto saxophone and Harold Mabern on piano, with George Coleman and Ron Carterarriving early in the year. For shows on the West Coast in March, Davis added drummer Frank Butler, but when it came time for the sessions, Davis jettisoned Strozier and Mabern in favor of pianist Victor Feldman. With a lucrative career as a session musician, Feldman declined Davis’ offer to join the group, and both he and Butler were left behind in California.[10] Back in New York, Davis located the musicians who would be with him for the next six years, Herbie Hancock and Tony Williams; with Carter and Coleman, the new Miles Davis Quintet was in place. Williams, then only 17 years old, had been working with Jackie McLean, and Hancock had already scored a hit single with “Watermelon Man“, done by percussionist Mongo Santamaria.

The assembled group at the April recording sessions finished enough material for an entire album, but Davis decided the uptempo numbers were not acceptable, and redid all of them with the new group at the May sessions in New York. Two of the ballad tunes recorded in Los Angeles were old – “Baby Won’t You Please Come Home” written in 1919 and a hit for Bessie Smith in 1923, while “Basin Street Blues” had been introduced by Louis Armstrong in 1928. None feature Coleman; all are quartet performances with Davis and the rhythm section. Read the rest of this entry »


[VIDEO] Bill Evans Trio: ‘Waltz For Debby’ London, 1965

Bill Evans – piano, Chuck Israels – bass, Larry Bunker – drums

 


Portrait In Jazz: Bill Evans Trio 1960

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Bill Evans TrioWhen I Fall In Love (with Victor Young, Edward Heyman)
album: Portrait In Jazz  release: 1960

Diary of a Radical Conformist  

 Portrait In Jazz 


Miles Davis’ ‘Kind Of Blue’ Turned 55 This Week

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Full Album – 50th Anniversary Collectors Edition HQ Audio

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Kind of Blue brought together seven now-legendary musicians in the prime of their careers: tenor saxophonist John Coltrane, alto saxophonist Julian “Cannonball” Adderley, pianists Bill Evans and Wynton Kelly, bassist Paul Chambers, drummer Jimmy Cobb and of course, trumpeter Miles Davis.

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And just as younger artists looked to Miles for guidance and inspiration, he looked to them for raw, new talent and innovative musical ideas. In the mid-1950s, Davis discovered gold in the subtle sounds of 25-year-old pianist Bill Evans, who he recruited into his late ’50s sextet. Evans would prove an essential contributor to the Kind of Blue sessions. Read the rest of this entry »


Vintage Jazz Cover: Miles Davis

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[VIDEO] Preservation, or Innovation? John McLaughlin: State of the Musical Arts

Unfortunate to hear a great artist lay out a thoughtful, passionate, lucid description of the problem– the decline of jazz in the U.S.–then offer a predictable, depressingly misguided solution: “make the government subsidize it!”

Did the Mahavishnu Orchestra depend on taxpayer subsidies? Did Miles Davis need a government check in order to flourish? Unthinkable. If music is dynamic and alive, people will beat down the doors to go see it. If it’s boring, people will ignore it.

What Is the Future of Jazz in New York? (punditfromanotherplanet.com)

Who Should Pay for the Arts? (city-journal.org)

If it’s waning, drained of its creative force, or is replaced by other artistic innovations, people will look elsewhere. Should it be put on life support? Kept alive artificially? Turned into a social program for talented but neglected musicians? There are technical revolutions, new media disruptions, that are still unfolding, that influences these outcomes, more than lectures about taste, or lowering standards just to get a gig.

The End of Jazz (punditfromanotherplanet.com)

Islam and American Jazz (punditfromanotherplanet.com)

He’s right, jazz one of America’s great original art forms. And he’s right that should be supported, not neglected. It’s part of our history. (though what kind of future it has, organically, is questionable) Foundations, philanthropy, and so on, absolutely, if that’s required to preserve it as a museum piece, or classical artifact. Or, if cities and states have the popular will to support it with government arts funding, then let public policy respond to that. But it won’t make audiences love it, it won’t lure them come see it. Only the music itself can do that.  Read the rest of this entry »


[VIDEO] Jack DeJohnette Drum Solo: Modern Drummer Festival 1997


[VIDEO] Herbie Hancock & Omar Hakim: ‘Call it 95’ LIVE ‘Dis Is Da Drum’

Album : Call It 95

Herbie Hancock – Piano

Jeff Lorber – Keys Bruce Hornsby -Keys

Omar Hakim – Drums

Check out Call It 95 at Amazon.com

 

 


[PHOTO] MILES DAVIS: ‘Best-Dressed Man of the 20th Century’

miles-davis-LIFE

Miles Davis was the best-dressed man of the 20th century. Starting out, he’d customise his pawnshop Brooks Brothers suits, cutting notches in the lapels in imitation of the Duke of Windsor. After 1949’s Birth of the Cool, he favoured the Ivy League look of European tailoring. In the 60s he went for slim-cut Italian suits and handmade doeskin loafers. He was always the coolest-looking man in the room. Hell, he even managed to look cool sporting a blood-splattered white khaki jacket following a scuffle with police outside Birdland. In the 70s his wardrobe went as far-gone funky as his music and he was the only man who could get away with wearing purple bell bottoms, kipper ties and hexagonal glasses.

Diary Of A Radical Conformist


Horace Silver Dead: Jazz Pianist Dies at 85

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“He not only defined the first steps in the style, he wrote several of its most durable staples, ran bands that embodied and transcended the idiom and perfected a piano manner which summed up hard bop’s wit and trenchancy and popular appeal.”

For Variety,  writes: Jazz pianist Horace Silver, synonymous with Blue Note Records when hard bop — a style he helped pioneer — became the label’s bread and butter, died at age 85 of natural causes at his home in New Rochelle, N.Y. His son Gregory confirmed the pianist’s death to several news outlets.

Silver, whose association with Blue Note spanned a quarter decade, produced a number of hits for the label beginning in 1955 with “Horace Silver and the Jazz Messengers,” a group that would continue under the leadership of co-founder Art Blakey when Silver split off on his own and crafted an amazingly diverse solo career that mixed jazz, blues, gospel and Latin influences.

Signature works like “The Preacher” and “Song for My Father,” the title track from Silver’s 1965 album, would help steer jazz into into a more soulful, less doctrinaire direction — a style also reflected by many young jazzmen of the day, including Herbie Hancock, Cannonball Adderley and Ramsey Lewis. Read the rest of this entry »


[VIDEO] Herbie Hancock Headhunters LIVE in Japan 2005: ‘Watermelon Man’

[Check out Amazon’s Herbie Hancock selection]

Headhunters ’05 – Watermelon Man – YouTube


CONFIRMED: Nancy Pelosi Under the Influence of LSD at Press Conference

“I never saw anything like what Harry Reid did. To watch him, was to watch a master at work.”

pelositrippin“This was an opportunity cost of time. We could have been talking about jobs, farm bill, immigration, any number of issues that need to be addressed, and I commend the Speaker for coming around for bringing it to the floor. I salute — I never saw anything like what Harry Reid did. To watch him, was to watch a master at work. He was superb, intellectually, politically astute, and just the sheer stamina of it all. And it was a sign of the respect that his members have for him.”

Nancy excused herself from the podium, put on sunglasses, congratulated her staff and associates, then got into a van with an unnamed member of the press corp, where they remained for 20 minutes.

According to a White House source, and confirmed by others in the parking lot, Nancy and the journalist reportedly smoked a doobie while listening to the 1970s jazz-rock-fusion Supergroup Mahavishnu Orchestra‘s “Between Nothingness and Eternity“, at extremely high volume.

“I had to cut sound on my microphone, the noise from the van was bleeding in” a TV reporter complained.

Asked later about her taste in music, Nancy was eager to discuss early-’70s rock-funk and jazz. “Jan Hammer’s keyboard work is amazing”, Nancy said, walking to her office. “Though I really like John McLaughlin‘s earlier work, in Lifetime, with Tony Williams, and Bitches Brew, with Miles Davis. Have you ever heard McLaughlin’s solo album, Devotion? There’s a song on there “Don’t let the Dragon Eat your Mother” that totally kicks ass”. She added “The engineering on the album isn’t ideal, but McLaughlin’s guitar solos are mind-melting”.

h/t Hot Air


Late Night Jazz: John McLaughlin

John McLaughlin was born on the 4th of January 1942 in Doncaster, England. His pioneering Super-fast, Super-loud Supergroup, the Mahavishnu Orchestra, left many in my generation with permanent hearing damage, and turned the rock world upside down. He’s 71 and still a killer. He, along with Miles Davis and his quintet were the foundations for jazz-rock fusion. I saw this quintet perform in 2010, and remember it fondly. For those up late at night, this is a good groove.

John McLaughlin