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University Leaders Fail: Measures to Broaden Gun-Carry Rights on College Campuses Falter

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Bills hampered by university leaders’ resistance, even in gun-friendly states

Ashby Jones reports: A push to expand rights to carry guns on public-college campuses has largely fizzled.

Of the 15 “campus carry” bills introduced earlier this year, none has passed.

“Nathan Scott, a former student at Florida State University who was shot in the leg in the school’s library by a gunman last November, said that having a gun would have helped him defend himself.”

Measures in 11 states have already effectively died, including in Florida, where gun-rights supporters had high hopes before two bills stalled before reaching floor votes.

And on Thursday, the Nevada senate defeated an 11th-hour move to tuck campus carry into a broader gun-range-femalefirearms measure, likely dooming the effort this year. Bills in at least two other states are expected to fail soon as well.

“If I had been armed, I would have shot the killer before he shot me, absolutely. It’s ridiculous that students aren’t able to carry.”

— Nathan Scott

Attention is now focused on lawmakers in Texas, who could vote to expand campus carry soon, in the waning days of the legislative session. A win in Texas, which could come as early as next week, could help keep the effort alive and provide momentum heading into 2016.

A man testifies at a February hearing in Austin, Texas, on gun rights. Photo: Eric Gay/Associated Press

A man testifies at a February hearing in Austin, Texas, on gun rights. Photo: Eric Gay/Associated Press

“Permit holders are more law-abiding than the general public, and there’s just no reason their constitutional rights should stop at the borders of a college or university.”

— Jennifer Baker, a spokeswoman for the National Rifle Association

The push to allow those with concealed-carry permits to carry firearms on campus picked up following the 2007 massacre at Virginia Tech University, in which 33 people, including the gunman, were killed.

[Read the full text here, at WSJ]

The National Rifle Association and other gun-rights groups say students should have had the ability to defend themselves with firearms.

A group of local public school teachers from nearby schools use rubber training guns as they practice proper firearms handling during a teachers-only firearms training class offered for free at the Veritas Training Academy in Sarasota, Florida January 11, 2013. The December 14 tragedy in Newtown, Connecticut, where 20 first-graders and six adults were killed at Sandy Hook Elementary School, has sparked a national debate about whether to arm teachers, prompting passionate arguments on both sides. REUTERS/Brian Blanco (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY POLITICS EDUCATION)

“Advocates of looser laws concerning guns on college campuses say that students trained with a gun would be better positioned to fend off a host of potential crimes, from sexual assaults to a Virginia Tech-style mass shooting.”

The effort also relates to a simmering legal debate over whether and to what degree the Second More-guns-less-crimeAmendment’s “right of the people to keep and bear arms” extends outside the home.

[See John R. Lott’s More Guns, Less Crime: Understanding Crime and Gun Control Laws, Third Edition (Studies in Law and Economics) at Amazon]

The U.S. Supreme Court, in its seminal 2008 ruling called District of Columbia v. Heller, found that the Second Amendment protects one’s right to possess a gun inside the home for self-defense. But the court didn’t say precisely when that right can be exercised in public. Since then, lower courts have wrestled with how to apply the Heller ruling to gun bans in public places, and legal experts think the Supreme Court will likely take up the question in another case before too long. Read the rest of this entry »

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US Ambassador Attacked in South Korea

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The U.S Ambassador to South Korea has been attacked in the country’s capital, according to local reports.

Mark Lippert

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Photos from South Korea’s official news agency show Ambassador Mark Lippert with blood on his hand and holding his face after he was attacked by what the Yonhap news agency says was “an armed man.”

Developing…

 ABC News