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#ObamaFarewellAddress: The Morning After

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Narcissus and the iPad

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Emojigate Threatens Clinton Campaign

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Hillary Clinton’s Student Debt Emoji Tweet Backfires


[VIDEO] Battle of Generations: ‘Bitter Boomer vs Millennial’ FBN’s Charlie Gasparino and National Review Reporter Jillian Melchior

FBN’s Charlie Gasparino and National Review Reporter Jillian Melchior battle it out over the millennial and boomer generations.

Watch Charlie Gasparino and Neil Cavuto talk about Lifestyle Budget on Cavuto.

 


Conservatism Is The New Punk Rock

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For TownHall.com,  Kurt Schlichter writes: Conservatism is the Ramones at CBGB – loud, fast and alive. In contrast, liberalism is the headliner at a state fair concert. It’s Foghat, serenading its anesthetized fans as America slow rides into decline.

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“Liberals want to see themselves as punks. They aren’t. They are sad conformists.”

Back in the 70s, the Ramones put a steel-toed boot into the behind of a fat, flabby rock ‘n roll world that has lost its way. That’s what conservatives are doing today to American politics and culture. And conservative-insurgencythe dinosaur rockers of the status quo hate it.

[Check out Kurt Schlichter’s book “Conservative Insurgency” at Amazon.com]

“Everything about liberalism is stodgy, everything is old, everything is about control.”

But some things have changed. Back in the 70’s, it was alienated young people leading the way, yet today’s Millennials support the very liberal status quo that keeps them down. What’s pathetic is that they are so eagerly complicit in their own serfdom.

Dead-end jobs, innovations like Uber sacrificed to protect established Democrat corporatist allies, and tons of student debt for their degrees in Feminist Interpretive punk-sneerDance – you Millennials have been, and will be, fooled again. And again and again.

I want to make clear for the record that The Who rocks, though many liberals are likely offended by Roger Daltrey’s shamelessly heteronormative persona.

Look at ancient Hillary Clinton, that improbable Millennial heroine. She’s the Bachman Turner Overdrive of American politics, out there literally taking care of business – especially the businesses who take care of her by paying her hundreds of thousands a pop to come talk to them. Read the rest of this entry »


Pew: Democrats Losing Millennials

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Breitbart.com reports:  Barack Obama may be the Republicans’ best friend when it comes to educating 18-33-year olds of the Millennial Generation about the downside of voting for the Democrats’ economic policies. According to a report from the Pew Research Center for Social and Demographic Trends, the 73.7 million Millennialsare “unattached to organized politics and religion, linked by social media, burdened by debt, distrustful of people, in no rush to marry— and optimistic about the future.”

This growing rejection of the Democrat Party will undoubtedly have consequences in the coming mid-term and presidential elections.

Millennials in 2008 were all about the Democratic Party, with only 38% identifying themselves as political independents. Millennials associated Republicans with “a wave of disappointments and embarrassments: Iraq, Hurricane Katrina, congressional corruption scandals, the mortgage crisis.” Millennials were extraordinarily motivated to turn out and vote in 2008 and even more motivated in 2012.

But 50% of Millennials now describe themselves as political independents, “near the highest levels of political disaffiliation recorded for any generation in the quarter-century,” according to the latest Pew Research poll. This comes despite 43% of Millennials and about half of their newborns being Hispanic, Asian, and black, ethnic groups that have strongly favored Democrats in the past. Read the rest of this entry »


Kirsten Powers: Millennial Isn’t Liberal

The generation making their own soda and designing their own shoes is voting Independent.

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For USA Today, Kirsten Powers writes: Bad news for Democrats: It seems Millennials are special little snowflakes after all.

A new report by the centrist Democratic think tank Third Way highlights the political complexity of a generation raised to believe they were utterly unique. When it comes to politics, they do it their way. Which could make the cohort that turned out en masse for President Obama unpredictable as voters.

Third Way focused on how Millennials’ experience as the first generation raised in an information-on-demand culture has shaped them. They are not “adaptors.” They have only known a world full of endless choices, not a life where you make do with what is available.

Third Way reported, “Living in an à la carte world with unlimited options, Millennials don’t feel they have to choose between two limited choices.” For their elders, it was Coke or Pepsi. But Millennials create their perfectly flavored soft drink with a Soda Stream. They design their own shoes on the Internet. They buy just the songs they like.

Read the rest of this entry »


Obama Is Losing the Millennials

Young voters are unhappy with Obamacare, college costs, lack of jobs

Young voters are unhappy with Obamacare, college costs, lack of jobs

Michael Barone  writes:  What do young Americans want? Something different from what they’ve been getting from the president they voted for by such large margins.

Evidence comes in from various polls. Voters under 30, the Millennial generation, produced numbers for Barack Obama 13 percentage points above the national average in 2008 and nine points above in 2012.

But in recent polls, Obama’s approval among those under 30 has been higher than the national average by only one percentage point (Quinnipiac), two points (ABC/Washington Post) and three points (YouGov/Economist).

Those differences are statistically significant. And that’s politically significant, since a higher percentage of Millennials than of the general population are Hispanic or black.

Read the rest of this entry »


Free-Speech Wars: You Are What You Say, Not What You Do

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David French writes: I appreciate Michael’s post about the latest Huffpo-reported controversies involving Steve Martin, Joan Rivers, Jennifer Lawrence, and many, many others. Peruse the pages of lefty news outlets like the Huffington Post and you’ll routinely run across headlines like, ”[Insert Celebrity Name] said WHAT?!?” or “[Insert previously unknown individual] fired for insensitive remarks.” Even the conservative press can sometimes feel like an engine of perpetual outrage over hateful or insensitive comments.

These “two minutes hates” are deeply corrosive to our free-speech culture, but they’re also the inevitable outgrowth of succeeding generations that increasingly define virtue not through actions but through attitudes. In other words, watch what I say. What I do is irrelevant. You’re a bad person if you say the wrong things, no matter what you might do for your family or your fellow man. A lifetime of good works can be rendered irrelevant by a single thoughtless tweet.

But what else can we expect when we live lives of increasing narcissism and when youth (the audience most fired up by social media) retreat from engagement with the real world? For years now, we’ve heard that Millennials were special – “Generation We” — the generation that was most concerned with social justice and helping others. Others said no, describing experience with a generation that was constantly managing its own image on social media, immersed in tweets and “likes” and selfies — all while expecting great returns for little work. But what do the data say? Is it Generation We or Generation Me?  Here’s Jean Twenge writing in The Atlantic:

In my 2006 book Generation Me, I presented data showing generational increases in self-esteem, assertiveness, self-importance, narcissism, and high expectations, based on surveys of 1.2 million young people, some dating back to the 1920s. These analyses indicated a clear cultural shift toward individualism and focusing on the self. But perhaps both views were correct — maybe Millennials’ greater self-importance found expression in helping others and caring about larger social causes.

Read the rest of this entry »


Will Young Voters Abandon Democrats? Don’t Hold Your Breath

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Dan Joseph writes: Recent polls show President Obama’s popularity plummeting among young voters. A Quinnipiac poll conducted in November shows that Obama’s approval rating among 18-29 years olds has fallen to a staggering 36 percent. This stunning drop among a demographic that gave Obama 66 percent of their vote in 2008, helping him coast to the presidency, has conservatives in a triumphant mood.

In light of these polling results many conservatives have concluded that young voters have finally witnessed the dangers of big government liberalism first-hand, and are now rethinking their allegiance to the Democratic Party.

But this rosy reading of polls is a mistake. A mistake that conservatives have made before.

In 2011, there was a similar, if less pronounced drop in support for Obama among young voters. Many Conservatives were convinced that Millennials were finally waking up from their snake-oil induced “Hope and Change” coma, and that they would undoubtedly abandon Obama in the 2012 election.

Yet, Obama ended up winning 60 percent of the 18-29 demographic. It was a slight drop from his 2008 numbers, but still a historically dominant performance.

Read the rest of this entry »


Why Millennials Can’t Grow Up

Rates of depression are soaring among millennials in college. Photo by Jupiter Images/Thinkstock/Getty Images

Rates of depression are soaring among millennials in college. Photo by Jupiter Images/Thinkstock/Getty Images

Millennial narcissism: Helicopter parents are college students’ bigger problem.

Amy (not her real name) sat in my office and wiped her streaming tears on her sleeve, refusing the scratchy tissues I’d offered. “I’m thinking about just applying for a Ph.D. program after I graduate because I have no idea what I want to do.” Amy had mild depression growing up, and it worsened during freshman year of college when she moved from her parents’ house to her dorm. It became increasingly difficult to balance school, socializing, laundry, and a part-time job. She finally had to dump the part-time job, was still unable to do laundry, and often stayed up until 2 a.m. trying to complete homework because she didn’t know how to manage her time without her parents keeping track of her schedule.

helicopterparentI suggested finding a job after graduation, even if it’s only temporary. She cried harder at this idea. “So, becoming an adult is just really scary for you?” I asked. “Yes,” she sniffled. Amy is 30 years old.

Her case is becoming the norm for twenty- to thirtysomethings I see in my office as a psychotherapist. I’ve had at least 100 college and grad students like Amy crying on my couch because breaching adulthood is too overwhelming.

In 2000, psychologist Jeff Arnet coined the term “emerging adolescence” to describe extended adolescence that delays adulthood. People in their 20s no longer view themselves as adults. There are various plausible reasons fo this, including longer life spans, helicopter parenting, and fewer high paying jobs that allow new college grads to be financially independent at a young age.

Read the rest of this entry »


Next Wave of Promising Young Republican Voters: Millennials Who Hate Obamacare

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 Republicans need young voters, Obama just handed it to them

Alex Roarty writes:  Republicans are searching for an in with Millennials, and they think Obamacare’s glitchy rollout is it.

Next to minorities, there’s no larger voting bloc more resistant to the Republican Party. (President Obama won 18 to 29 year olds by at least 23 points in both of his campaigns.) GOP leaders feared the party’s positions on social issues like gay marriage and immigration had alienated a generation of voters.

But then the Affordable Care Act’s online exchanges went live, or tried to, on Oct. 1. Now, with everyone from comedian Jon Stewart to the satirical Onion web site mocking the program’s rollout, Republicans see a chance to convince young voters that big-government solutions favored by Democrats don’t work.

It’s an argument resting on an assumption about young people: Even if they possess an overall liberal bent, youths reserve enough skepticism for big government – and big institutions generally – to make them receptive to the GOP’s message. The heart of a fiscal conservative, they hope, lies inside every Millennial.

Read the rest of this entry »