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[PHOTO] Gemini Mission Control, 1965

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Gemini Mission Control

Overall view of the Mission Control Center (MCC), Houston, Texas, during the Gemini 5 flight. Note the screen at the front of the MCC which is used to track the progress of the Gemini spacecraft.

NASA on The Commons – Flickr

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The Crew of the Space Shuttle Columbia: ‘We Remember…Feb. 1, 2003…12 Years Ago Today’

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The seven-member crew of the STS-107 mission was just 16 minutes from landing on the morning of Feb. 1, 2003, when Mission Control lost contact with the shuttle Columbia. A piece of foam, falling from the external tank during launch, had opened a hole in one of the shuttle’s wings, leading to the breakup of the orbiter upon re-entry.

Addressing the nation, President Bush said, “mankind is led into the darkness beyond our world by the inspiration of discovery and the longing to understand. Our journey into space will go on.”

Remembering Columbia – NASA – Johnson Space Center on Twitter


Progress M-21M Successfully Docked at the ISS

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April 25, 2014 at 16 hours 13 minutes Moscow time successfully re-docked cargo vehicle Progress M-21M at the International Space Station (ISS).

Space station cargo craft completes test of automated rendezvous system

Rendezvous and docking with the station were carried out in automatic mode under control specialists Mission Control Center. During the rendezvous and docking operation audited rendezvous “Course-by” on the vehicle cargo ship Progress M-21M. TGC Progress M-21M docked to the instrument compartment of the service module Zvezda, where he went to the autonomous flight two days ago.

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Progress space cargo approaching the docking port of the service module Zvezda on ISS Read the rest of this entry »


[VIDEO] Christmas Eve Spacewalk Astronauts set out on dangerous mission a day before Christmas

NASA: Christmas Eve spacewalk could wrap up repair The Christmas Eve spacewalk planned by NASA at the International Space Station should wrap up repair work on a faulty cooling line.

Mission Control said Monday that unless something goes awry, two astronauts ought to finish installing a new ammonia pump Tuesday, during this second spacewalk. NASA originally thought three spacewalks might be needed.

Astronauts Rick Mastracchio and Michael Hopkins removed the faulty pump Saturday. Everything went so well, they jumped ahead in their effort to fix the external cooling line that shut down Dec. 11.

A bad valve in the pump caused the breakdown, prompting the urgent series of spacewalk repairs.

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