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EXCLUSIVE: Hong Kong Democracy Demonstrations — Night 4

The leading English language paper in Hong Kong is reporting that “leaders” of the student demonstrators have set a deadline of tomorrow for Hong Kong’s Chief Executive (basically, the governor), C.Y. Leung, to resign.  If he doesn’t, they say they’ll start to “occupy” government buildings:

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I assume that if this happens, things may well turn ugly again, as they did on the first night when riot police fired tear gas into the crowd and sprayed the students with pepper spray.

But tonight, in the middle of the two-day National Day holiday (ironically, celebrating the 65th anniverary of the founding of the Peoples Republic of China), the crowds at the Central/Admiralty district site swelled and an almost carnival-like atmosphere prevailed:

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Hongkongers have donated thousands of umbrellas to the demonstrators. The movement has come to be known as the “Umbrella Revolution,” because the students used umbrellas to protect themselves from pepper spray on the first night.

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Pictures of C.Y. Leung taped to the street.

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Many of the students have been on site for days.

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This young lady was drawing caricatures of her companions.

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Although the majority of Hongkongers are Cantonese-speaking Chinese, Hong Kong is a multi-ethnic city and many groups had signs expressing solidarity.

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Signs along the blocked freeway’s guardrails in many languages expressed support for the demonstrators.

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The iconic Bank of China Tower provides a backdrop to one high spot favored by photographers capturing the throng.

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The sea of people jammed into the road in front of the central government offices.

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Distribution of supplies continues to improve. Stations like this are common throughout the area.

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The pedestrian overpass leading to the central government building is festooned with pro-democracy banners and slogans urging Hongkongers to maintain their resolve.

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Volunteers press water bottles and food on people passing along the main walkway through the heart of the demonstration.

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Volunteers man a spot set aside for crossing over the concrete barriers on either side of the blocked road.

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A sea of lights as the crowd waves their cell phones.

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You can just make out the cell phone lights through the crowd.

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Many posters used the umbrella motif.

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C.Y. Leung is a popular subject of protest art work.

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The first aid area I spotted a couple of days ago has grown into a well-manned clinic.

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Hong Kong’s Occupy Central Plans Civil Disobedience Protest in October

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HONG KONG—The Hong Kong protest movement Occupy Central plans to launch a civil-disobedience campaign in early October to protest Beijing’s decision to effectively control who can run for the city’s top post, said a person close to the group.

“Many people, including professors who were previously against Occupy Central, are now in support of the movement, whether through direct participation or donations.”

— Chan Kin-man, a co-founder of Occupy Central

The group last week had indicated a loss of momentum following the announcement of the Chinese decision on Aug. 31.

The person close to Occupy Central said holding the protest a full month after Beijing’s decision was aimed at giving supporters ample time to “decide for themselves” whether to join the cause in a “coolheaded” fashion. The person said detailed protest plans were still being made.

The person denied that the timing was chosen to coincide with the weeklong holiday around China’s National Day on Oct. 1. That is traditionally one of the biggest shopping weeks of the year in Hong Kong, when a lot of mainlanders visit the city. Read the rest of this entry »