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The Cajun Navy’s New Naval Destroyer ‘CNS Thibodeaux’ Has Been Delivered Just In Time

LAFAYETTE, LA – With the heavy rains quickly approaching the Acadiana area over the next few days, the Cajun Navy can take heart in the fact that their new naval destroyer has been delivered to them in their efforts to help the local populous.

Thanks to plenty of donations to the Cajun Navy after last year’s August floods, the group were able to purchase the $1.8b Arleigh Burke-Class Destroyer, and it seems that it has been completed just in the nick of time.

“We were loading up the trusty yet old wooden boat onto the back of a truck when the contractor called”, explained Cajun Navy member Robert Kraft, “He said that it was ready for usage and that he’d parked it in a Youngsville neighborhood with the keys in the ignition. It couldn’t have come at a better time, what with Harvey hitting the area as it has done.” Read the rest of this entry »

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Royal Navy Unveils Robot Spy Speedboat 

The 34ft boat can skim across the waves at more than 50kts to track high speed targets, while navigating and dodging other ships without the control of a human.

Naval commanders believe the Maritime Autonomy Surface Testbed (MAST) could herald a robot fleet of high-speed craft packed with sensors to carry out spy and scouting missions.

The unarmed test craft is one of 40 prototypes to be tested by the Royal Navy in a major robot war game off the coast of northern Scotland in October.

The dawn of unmanned vehicles is likely to have the same revolutionary effect on naval warfare as the birth of flight and aircraft carriers, according to the navy’s Fleet Robotics Officer.

Cdr Peter Pipkin said: “This is a chance to take a great leap forward in maritime systems – not to take people out of the loop but to enhance everything they do, to extend our reach, our look, our timescales, our efficiency using intelligent and manageable robotics at sea.”

MAST has been built for the MoD’s defence laboratories and is based on an existing Bladerunner speedboat, but fitted with sensors and robotic technology that is still largely classified.

The boat has a sophisticated anti-collision system to avoid hazards and other craft, but current laws meant that when it was unveiled on the Thames, it had to have a human coxswain on board.

While the MAST is only a test platform for new technology and will not enter service as it stands, sources said it could it pave the way for future robots vessels that can track, shadow or spy on other craft as well as loitering off coastlines.

Elizabeth Quintana, director of military sciences at the Royal United Services Institute, said the Navy was looking at unmanned vehicles to take on “dull, dirty, and dangerous” jobs.  Read the rest of this entry »


BREAKING: Four Marines Dead in Shooting Attack at Tennessee Navy Facility

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Officials: 5 victims in Chattanooga shootings

Four Marines were reportedly killed Thursday in one of two attacks at U.S. Navy facilities in Chattanooga, Tenn., and at least one shooter was dead.

The Marines were killed by a gunman who opened fire at a Naval Reserves Operations Center on Amnicola Highway, according to the Chattanooga Times Free Press. Marilyn Hutcheson, who works at Binswanger Glass just across the street from the Naval Reserve Center on Amnicola Highway, said she heard a barrage of gunfire around 11 a.m.

“I couldn’t even begin to tell you how many. It was rapid fire, like pow pow pow pow pow, so quickly. The next thing I knew, there were police cars coming from every direction.”

– Marilyn Hutcheson, a witness

“I couldn’t even begin to tell you how many,” she said. “It was rapid fire, like pow pow pow pow pow, so quickly. The next thing I knew, there were police cars coming from every direction.”

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The names of the Marines who were reportedly shot were not immediately released, and government officials did not confirm the report.

The shooting there came around the same time that a gunman in a silver Mustang opened fire at a Navy recruiting office in a strip mall some seven miles away, on Lee’s Highway. The shooter stopped in front of the recruiting facility, shot at the building and drove off, said Brian Lepley, a spokesman with the U.S. Army Recruiting Command in Fort Knox, Ky.

“This is a very, very terrible situation. I’m very concerned about what’s going on. We need to figure out how to handle it.”

— Andy Berke, the city’s mayor

Lepley said the recruiting center on Old Lee Highway has recruiting services for all four branches of the military. The Army recruiters told Lepley they have evacuated and are safe. He has no information about recruiters for the other branches.

It was not immediately known if the shootings were related, or what prompted them. Read the rest of this entry »


[PHOTO] Sailors Playing Pinball

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Ongoing Anti-Terror Non-War Plan Unveiled

operation-cluster


The Navy’s Exoskeleton Could Make Workers 20 Times More Productive


America Chooses a Navy: Competition with China for the Global Future

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George Will writes: Russia’s ongoing dismemberment of Ukraine and the Islamic State’s erasing of Middle Eastern borders have distracted attention from the harassment of U.S. Navy aircraft by Chinese fighter jets over the South China Sea. Beijing calls this sea, and the Yellow and East China seas, the “near seas,” meaning China’s seas. The episodes involving aircraft are relevant to one of Admiral Jonathan Greenert’s multiplying preoccupations — CUES, meaning Code for Unplanned Encounters at Sea.

“Cascading dangers are compelling Americans to think afresh about something they prefer not to think about at all — foreign policy.”

This is designed to prevent incendiary accidents, a topic of special interest during this month’s centennial commemorations of the beginning of a war that, ignited by miscalculations, ruined the 20th century. Greenert, chief of naval operations, has carrier-based aircraft flying from the Persian Gulf to targets in Iraq. He is, however, always thinking about the far side of the largest ocean.

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One hundred years ago, the principal challenge of world diplomacy, which failed spectacularly, was to peacefully integrate a rising, restless power — Germany — into the international system. Today’s comparable challenge is China. Greenert, who knows well his Chinese counterpart, Admiral Wu Shengli, radiates a serene patience about China. Read the rest of this entry »


Call & Response: U.S. Sends Second Carrier to Asia Amid Tensions with China

Nuclear powered aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70)

Nuclear powered aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) The Vinson will join the Japan-based USS George Washington strike group. 

China demands end to U.S. surveillance flights 

 reports: The Navy is sending a second aircraft carrier strike group to the Asia Pacific region amid new tensions with China over a dangerous aerial encounter between a Chinese interceptor and Navy P-8 surveillance craft.P-8A-buzzed-map

 “We stand by our account of this dangerous and unprofessional incident.”

— Pentagon spokesman Rear Adm. John Kirby

The strike group led by the USS Carl Vinson departed San Diego for the Pacific on Friday, the Navy said in an announcement of what it terms a “planned” deployment.

China’s military on Saturday, meanwhile, demanded an end to all U.S. monitoring flights and called U.S. criticism of  dangerous Chinese jet maneuvers false.

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Chinese Defense Ministry spokesman Yang Yujun

Chinese Defense Ministry spokesman Yang Yujun said in a statement that a Chinese fighter jet made a “regular identification and verification” of the Navy P-8 anti-submarine warfare jet during an encounter in an area 135 miles east of Hainan Island.

“We are concerned that the intercepting crews from that unit are acting aggressively and demonstrating a lack of regard for the regard for the safety of our aircrews.”

— Pentagon spokesman Lt. Col. Jeff Pool

Yang called Pentagon criticism of the incident “totally groundless” and insisted the Chinese pilot operated professionally and kept a safe distance.

A P-8A Poseidon assigned to Patrol Squadron (VP) 16 is seen in flight over Jacksonville, Fla. (U.S Navy photo by Personnel Specialist 1st Class Anthony Petry

A P-8A Poseidon assigned to Patrol Squadron (VP) 16 is seen in flight over Jacksonville, Fla. (U.S Navy photo by Personnel Specialist 1st Class Anthony Petry)

The Chinese spokesman’s account, published in the state-run Xinhua news agency, is at odds with Pentagon officials who called the encounter both dangerous and aggressive. A White House official also said the dangerous intercept was a Chinese “provocation.”

“We have registered our strong concerns to the Chinese about the unsafe and unprofessional intercept, which posed a risk to the safety and the well-being of the air crew and was inconsistent with customary international law.”

— Rear Adm. John Kirby

Pentagon spokesman Rear Adm. John Kirby on Friday called the maneuvers by the Chinese J-11—a Russian design Su-27—a dangerous and unprofessional encounter and said the military has protested the incident to the Chinese military. Read the rest of this entry »


[VIDEO] Immigration Policy and Preventative Measures Down Under: ‘If You Come the Wrong Way, You Will Never Get to Stay’

“It is controversial, but it is working.”

The idea at the heart of this policy is not controversial. In fact, it’s one that the majority of the American public already supports. And is supported even more passionately by new U.S. citizens, those who immigrated here legally. It’s the enforcement apparatus required that’s controversial.

“These people that were coming were seen as queue-jumpers, and it’s not fair to the genuine refugees.”

Exactly. What about those who waited in line, and followed the rules? Many feel betrayed, and resent that their respect for the process is being undermined by pro-amnesty activists. Not just radical groups protesting at the border, but pro-amnesty activists in all three branches of government. Often the loudest voices are the ones with the most questionable motives. American-Boomerang

[Check out Nick Adams’s book “The American Boomerang: How the World’s Greatest ‘Turnaround’ Nation Will Do It Again” at Amazon.com]

From The Corner:

Australian-born political commentator Nick Adams joined Bill O’Reilly to share his country’s approach towards illegal immigration. Part of the policy includes the national Navy physically intercepting boats of immigrants trying to enter the country illegally and denying them the ability to land on Australian shores.

A moat? Nations like Japan, and Australia, have a natural geographical protection–surrounded by deep water–from millions of immigrants crossing borders illegally to “live in the shadows”. The U.S. Mexico border is 1,989 long. 

Though, to be fair, as critics of the pro-border control argument remind us, the majority of the U.S.’s illegal immigrants don’t enter by crossing borders illegally. They do it by applying for temporary visas, then violate their visas by overstaying. Then exploiting pro-amnesty sentiment to justify never returning to their native residence. Or, you know–not unlike getting distracted and neglecting to get a haircut–being busy, and forgetting to return home for ten or twenty years when the visa is up.

 Nick Adams noted that not implementing such preventative measures was encouraging people to take the life-risking journey across the ocean…(read more)

 National Review Online


Tuna Robot! Navy Tests UUV

Tuna-Robot-Navy

The Future of Underwater Surveillance?

For Defense TechKris Osborn reports: The Navy is testing a stealthy, 4 foot-long fish-shaped autonomous underwater vehicle designed to blend in with undersea life and perform combat sensor functions, service officials explained.

Navy-tuna-robot

The so-called “bio-memetic” undersea vehicle is currently being developed as part of the Chief of Naval Operations Rapid Innovation Cell,  or CRIC – a special unit set up by CNO Adm. Jonathan Greenert in 2012 to explore the feasibility of rapidly turning around commercially available technologies for Naval military use.

“You could have a sub with a fish-like UUV tethered onto a cable, giving real time feedback as opposed to current ones that come back for a download…”

— Capt. Jim Loper, Navy Warfare Development Command

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“It mimics a fish. It looks like a fish. We call it robo-tuna, affectionately, but it is a UUV (unmanned undersea vehicle).  It does not have a propeller or a jet. It actually swims by flipping its tail around,” said Capt. Jim Loper, concepts and innovation department head, Navy Warfare Development Command, Norfolk. Read the rest of this entry »


[VIDEO] Inside the USS Ford, America’s Newest Aircraft Carrier

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Under construction in Virginia, this floating city is more powerful than any carrier that has come before.

Newport News, Va. — Joe Pappalardo writes: U.S. Navy Capt. John Meier wants the USS Ford, the first of the United States’ new class of aircraft carrier, to be completed by March 2016. Later that year his term as the ship’s commanding officer will end, and his replacement will be the first to take the vessel (CVN-78) out on the water under its own power. “So I have a vested interest in keeping the ship on schedule, and not only for the Navy and the nation’s sake,” he says.

A trip to the Newport News Shipbuilding, where the Ford is being constructed, makes it clear that aircraft carriers are not delivered, gift wrapped, to the Navy. They are built one compartment at a time. There are 2500 compartments in the USS Ford. Right now the Navy “owns” about 10 percent of them. There are about 800 Navy personnel working here already. The 3D blueprint used to convert sheets of steel into a vessel is now creating a floating warship.  Read the rest of this entry »


Breaking: Navy Releases Map Showing Location of Fleet Positions During Benghazi Attacks

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[See Full-Size Map]

The Daily Caller reports:  The Navy has released a map showing the locations of its fleet positions near Benghazi, Libya on Sept. 11, 2012 — when terrorists killed four Americans, including U.S. Ambassador Chris Stevens.

[View the map and the letter from the Navy]

The unclassified map — which was obtained by a retired Air Force veteran investigating the attacks through a public records request and published online by the group Judicial Watch — shows that there were dozens of vessels in the region during the attacks.

NavymapBenghazi

On the day of the attacks, the Navy had two aircraft carriers, four amphibious ships, 13 destroyers, three cruisers, a dozen small Navy boats and a command ship, Judicial Watch noted in its analysis of the map.

Read the rest of this entry »


How Political Correctness Took Down Navy SEALs

Matthew McCabe (pictured) and Jonathan Keefe caught the man who butchered American contractors. Their reward? Court-martial

Matthew McCabe (pictured) and Jonathan Keefe caught the man who butchered American contractors. Their reward? Court-martial

Kyle Smith reports:  The night of Sept. 1, 2009, Echo Platoon of Navy SEAL Team 10 headed out into the Fallujah night. Their goal: concluding a five-year search for the al Qaeda killer who had been responsible for the shocking 2004 murders of four American military contractors — one of them an ex-SEAL — whose bodies were then burned, dragged through the streets and hanged from a bridge.

This night the SEALs departed with these words from their commanding officer: “Gents, stay sharp, and expect a firefight.”

Iraqis chant anti-American slogans as a charred boy hangs from a bridge over the Euphrates river in Fallujah. Photo: Getty Images

Iraqis chant anti-American slogans as a charred boy hangs from a bridge over the Euphrates river in Fallujah. Photo: Getty Images

In the event, no shots were fired, but the SEALs faced another kind of ambush: a humiliating, baffling, infuriating struggle with the military-justice system that would end with an unsatisfying victory.

Because the man those SEALs captured — Ahmad Hashim Abd Al-Isawi, aka “the Butcher of Fallujah,” a man who lived for mayhem — somehow sustained a bloody lip on the night of his capture.

The contrast between the two instances of violence seems, like many of the details of the case, absurd.

On the one hand, four Blackwater contractors were murdered and beheaded as they pulled security in a convoy that was attempting to deliver food.

Read the rest of this entry »


Notice a Pattern? Obama Honors Pearl Harbor Dead with Picture of Himself

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President Barack Obama’s Facebook page on Saturday posted a message honoring the dead from Pearl Harbor—accompanied by a picture of Obama descending the stairs next to the Pearl Harbor Memorial.

The picture barely fits the name of the Arizona Memorial so it can frame Obama in the foreground.

The post’s statement reads:

Today, with solemn pride and reverence, let us remember those who fought and died at Pearl Harbor, acknowledge everyone who carried their legacy forward, and reaffirm our commitment to upholding the ideals for which they served.

President Obama

The Obama Administration’s current shipbuilding plan shrinks the size of the Navy from 313 to 298 ships. During a debate in the 2012 election, the President famously responded to concerns about the Navy’s smaller size with a quip about the armed forces also having fewer “horses and bayonets.”

Obama Posts Another Picture of Himself


Navy Conducts Carrier-Based Testing of Drone In Va.

Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) is shown in this undated handout photo from the aircraft's manufacturer, General Atomics. General Atomics explains that the previous "RQ" designation for this vehicle has recently been changed to "MQ" to reflect the aircrafts multi-functional capabilities. The new designation moves the Predator from a strictly reconnaissance role, to an ability to carry and fire weapons such as the "Hellfire" missile. (Photo by General Atomics/Getty Images)

Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) is shown in this undated handout photo from the aircraft’s manufacturer, General Atomics. General Atomics explains that the previous “RQ” designation for this vehicle has recently been changed to “MQ” to reflect the aircrafts multi-functional capabilities. The new designation moves the Predator from a strictly reconnaissance role, to an ability to carry and fire weapons such as the “Hellfire” missile. (Photo by General Atomics/Getty Images)

The Navy says tests have demonstrated a drone’s ability to integrate with the environment of an aircraft carrier.

The X-47B unmanned combat air system demonstrator was tested Saturday and Sunday during flight operations aboard the U.S. Theodore Roosevelt.

Read the rest of this entry »


[VIDEO] U.S. Sells Navy’s First Ever Supercarrier — All 60,000 Tons of it — for 1¢

The U.S. Navy’s first supercarrier, the now-decommissioned USS Forrestal (AVT-59)has been sold for one cent to Texas-based All Star Metals to be taken apart and scrapped.

The Navy awarded the contract to the company on Oct. 22. The net price proposed by the company “considered the estimated proceeds from the sale of the scrap metal to be generated from dismantling,” according to an official statement.

Now, All Star Metals will develop a plan to tow the aging carrier — first launched in 1954 and decommissioned in 1993 — from Philadelphia to Brownsville, Texas.

Read the rest of this entry »


REPORT: Two missing after crash of U.S. Navy helicopter in Red Sea

The SH-60B Seahawk. The MH-60S has the Seahawk's automatic rotor blade folding system and rapid folding tail pylon for shipborne operations.

The SH-60B Seahawk. The MH-60S has the Seahawk’s automatic rotor blade folding system and rapid folding tail pylon for shipborne operations. Source – naval-technology.com

(CNN) — Three crew members aboard a U.S. Navy helicopter that crashed in the Red Sea on Sunday were found alive and in stable condition, the Navy said. Two others remained missing.

The MH-60S Knighthawk was operating with the guided-missile destroyer USS William P. Lawrence when it went down in the central Red Sea, which lies between Africa and the Arabian Peninsula.

Search efforts are under way for the two remaining crew members.

The cause of the crash is under investigation; however, the Navy said it “was not due to any sort of hostile activity.”

CNN.com


In Tomorrows Wars, Battles Will Be Fought With a 3-D Printer

BY ROBERT BECKHUSEN

A 3-D printed drone is shot down by insurgents near a far-flung base manned by the U.S. military. Within hours, a small lab dropped onto the base by a helicopter days before churns out a replacement — along with plenty of ammunition and reinforced shelters for the troops. A few miles off a nearby coastline, a naval ship-turned-factory harvests resources from the sea and uses on-board printers to make everything from food to replacement organs.

It’s a far-out vision for future combat, but at least one naval officer thinks it could happen. According to Lt. Cmdr. Michael Llenza, who sketched out the scenario in the latest Armed Forces Journal, 3-D printing could arguably “upend the way we think about supply chains, sea basing and even maritime strategy.” And by we, Llenza doesn’t just mean Americans. The Chinese military is already bragging about how they are printing parts for their next-gen aircraft.

Aside from drones — which have already been printed — ammunition could potentially be produced with the machines, as the casings would be “relatively easy,” he writes. (The Pentagon would just have to find a way to produce the propellants.) Additive manufacturing also “offers a new way to think about building shelters or other structures on a beachhead or forward operating base.” The hope, as the theory goes, is that large-scale investments in 3-D printing could take a lot of strain off the supply lines modern military forces depend on to survive.

None of this amounts to the official position of the Pentagon, but publications like the Armed Forces Journal serve as influential arenas where many theories and ideas from military officers — some which are later incorporated — are first put up for debate. And it’s no surprise the potential (and existing) military uses of 3-D printers has been getting a lot of recent ink.

In April, Navy lieutenants Scott Cheney-Peters and Matthew Hipple sketched out a theoretical future Navy in the widely read U.S. Naval Institute journal Proceedings that imagined ships capable ofharvesting the oceans for 3-D printing material, and floating factories capable of manufacturing repair parts for a fleet of ships. Even shipyards, the authors wrote, could be effectively converted into giant 3-D printers. Llenza, who is also a Senior Naval Fellow at the non-partisan Atlantic Council, has taken that concept and run with it.

But there are also dangers, he warns…

Read the rest of this entry »


Navy replaces admiral leading Mideast strike group

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Rear Adm. Charles M. Gaouette receives honors from side boys during a change of command ceremony aboard the USS John C. Stennis on April 5, 2012.

KENNETH ABBATE/US NAVY

By ROBERT BURNS

The Associated Press
Published: October 27, 2012

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Rear Admiral Charles Gaouette
DEFENSE DEPARTMENT

WASHINGTON — The Navy said Saturday it is replacing the admiral in command of an aircraft carrier strike group in the Middle East, pending the outcome of an internal investigation into undisclosed allegations of inappropriate judgment.

Rear Adm. Charles M. Gaouette is being sent back to the USS John C. Stennis’ home port at Bremerton, Wash., in what the Navy called a temporary reassignment. The Navy said he is not formally relieved of his command of the Stennis strike group but will be replaced by Rear Adm. Troy M. Shoemaker, who will assume command until the investigation is completed.

It is highly unusual for the Navy to replace a carrier strike group commander during its deployment.

The Navy did not reveal details of the allegations, citing only an accusation of “inappropriate leadership judgment” that arose during the strike group’s deployment to the Middle East. Rear Adm. John Kirby, the Navy’s chief spokesman, declined to discuss the investigation.

The Stennis group deployed from Bremerton in late August and had entered the Navy 5th Fleet’s area of operations in the Middle East on Oct. 17 after sailing across the Pacific. The Stennis made port visits in Thailand and Malaysia on its way to the Middle East.

It deployed four months earlier than scheduled in response to a request by the commander of U.S. Central Command, Marine Gen. James Mattis, to maintain two aircraft carriers in the Middle East. The Stennis replaced the USS Enterprise carrier group.

Defense Secretary Leon Panetta visited the Stennis and its sailors in Bremerton shortly before they departed. He thanked them for accelerating their deployment on short notice.

“I understand that it is tough,” Panetta said. “We are asking an awful lot of each of you, but frankly you are the best I have and when the world calls we have to respond.”

via Navy – Stripes