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New York Post Front Page, Friday, February 20, 2015: ‘Best Shot at Oscar!’

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‘The Nightingale’: Why China Chose a French-Directed Film as Its Oscar Submission

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For WSJLilian Lin and Josh Chin: After decades of failed bids for the best foreign-language film Oscar, China appears to be hoping it can borrow a little of France’s Academy Award magic. Actually, make that a lot.

“It’s a mild, breezy, accessible, feel-good drama which really pictures China as a harmonious, wonderful place where conflicts of various stripes – across age, class or geographical divides – could easily be reconciled.”

In a surprise choice, China’s film authority submitted “The Nightingale,” a Sino-French co-production nightingale-directdirected by French director Philippe Muyl, as its entry in this year’s foreign-language category at the 2015 Academy Awards, state media reported this week.

“It really fits with the Chinese government’s current dominant political narrative of seeking to maintain stability in society at the same time when chaos sweeps across the body politic.”

— Clarence Tsui, The Hollywood Reporter

The Nightingale,” which tells the story of a road trip taken by an old man and his spoiled granddaughter through the southern Chinese countryside, is an adaptation of Muyl’s uplifting 2002 odd-couple drama “The Butterfly,” which was well-received in China despite never being officially released here.

Although the structure of the two films is similar, Mr. Muyl has described the “The Nightingale” as a thoroughly Chinese story. “We originally planned to make a Chinese version of ‘The Butterfly,’ but later we changed our mind and wanted to created something more originally Chinese,” he said in a video promotion for the film.

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In choosing “The Nightingale,” China’s film authorities passed over a number of strong candidates, including period drama “Coming Home” by Zhang Yimou, arguably the country’s most prominent director, and Diao Yinan’s noirish “Black Coal, Thin Ice,” which walked away with the Golden Bear award at the Berlin Film Festival earlier this year. Read the rest of this entry »


Oscar Season Begins: Sorting the Art from the Propaganda, no easy task

sorcerers-apprenticeRoger L. Simon writes: Every year at this time, my house turns into a version of The Sorcerer’s Apprentice from Disney’s Fantasia, with endless brooms and buckets descending on hapless Mickey Mouse. Only the brooms and buckets are DVDs of the year’s movies sent to me, as a member of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, to garner my Oscar vote. Like The Sorcerer’s Apprentice, the process begins as a benign, hopeful experience but then can turn almost nightmarish, as flick after flick shows up at my door, my will to watch declining with each new arrival. And this year hasn’t even begun so benignly. Read the rest of this entry »