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[PHOTOS] Harlem in the 1970s

 

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The 20th Anniversary of the Castro Regime’s ’13 de Marzo’ Tugboat Massacre

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All they wanted was to escape tyranny and slavery and give their children and themselves a chance to live in freedom. For Cuba’s Castro dictatorship, however, such yearning for liberty is a sin against the revolution. In fact, it is a sin so grave and so heinous that it is punishable by death….(read more)

L.A. Liberty


BREAKING: Two Killed in Shooting at Cancer Treatment Center

rockwood+shooting+4+7.8.14

SPOKANE, Wash. – KING5.com Seattle reports: Two people were fatally shot at Rockwood Cancer Treatment Center near Deaconess Hospital Tuesday morning. Authorities said around 10:15 that one suspect was in custody.

The medical center is located in the Downtown area, along West 5th and Monroe. Read the rest of this entry »


[VIDEO] Phenomenal Women: Jazzwomen Makin’ Waves and Breakin’ Free

One of my favorite simmerin’-sauce jazz bloggers, Jazzybeatchick, has an item you’ll want to see more of…

Jazzybeatchick writes:

I wanted to feature the Phenomenal Women who have influenced and were inspirational in my life particularly in the 1960’s when civil rights was not solely relegated to race.  Mom was my role model.  my B1FF and beside the fact that she was the best mom; it’s because she was an educator who believed and promoted multiethnic culturalism including women  to assimilate into American cultural life.  That meant not to segregate but the inclusion where we all would learn about diversity and to respect and appreciate one another.  My father, forced to deal racism in the jazz world, chose not make waves however it was whole different talk show when it came to allowing women to participate in performances because that would’ve make the situation worse on both fronts.  Neither agenda survived!

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Christianity, post-Christianity, and the Future of the West

Editor’s note: The following address was given at the inaugural conference of the Transatlantic page_2012_osullivan_squareChristian Council, held in Brussels on December 4. 

John O’Sullivan  writes:  It is often said that we live in a post-Christian society. That is true, but its meaning is generally misunderstood. A post-Christian society is not merely a society in which agnosticism or atheism is the prevailing fundamental belief. It is a society rooted in the history, culture, and practices of Christianity but in which the religious beliefs of Christianity have been either rejected or, worse, forgotten. In other words a post-Christian society is a particular sort of Christian society. It is quite different, for instance, from a post-Muslim or a post-Buddhist society (if we can imagine such things). At an emotional level, its Christian character explains why many agnostics and atheists nonetheless find Christian hymns suitable and comforting at occasions such as funerals and weddings. Intellectually, its dormant Christian beliefs — notably those about the nature of Man — underpin our ideas on politics and foreign policy, as for instance on human rights. Even the Enlightenment — which strong secularists like to cite as the foundation of Western liberal polities — is an extension of Christianity as much as a rejection of it. In short, though much of what Christianity taught is forgotten, even unknown, by modern Europeans and Americans, they nonetheless act on its teachings every day.

But there are consequences to forgetting truths. One consequence is that while we instinctively want to preserve the morals and manners of the Christian tradition, we cannot quite explain or defend them intellectually. So we find ourselves seeking more contemporary (i.e., in practice, secular) reasons for preserving them or, when they decay completely, inventing regulations to mimic them. When courtesy is abandoned, we invent speech codes, which are blunter in their impact and repress legitimate disagreement along with insults. When female sexual modesty and male sexual restraint are discredited as puritanical, we draw up contractual arrangements to ensure that any sexual contact is voluntary on both sides. This means that sexual relationships (and their consequences) may occur more often but that they do so in an atmosphere of mutual suspicion and legal wariness that poisons relations between men and women over the long run. Above all, when we no longer protect and strengthen the family on the grounds that it is a patriarchal institution harmful to the life chances of women, we encourage the family breakdown that leaves women worse off financially, pushes men into an irresponsible life, and damages their children socially and psychologically.

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[VIDEO] Professor of Economics Walter Williams talks about the Encroachment of Government

Walter E. Williams is the John M. Olin Distinguished Professor of Economics at George Mason University and an adjunct scholar at the Cato Institute. He is an expert on discrimination, labor policy, regulation, and South Africa as well as a well-known columnist and the author of South Africa’s War Against Capitalism (1989), The State Against Blacks (1982), and More Liberty Means Less Government (1999).

In this lecture given at a Libertarian Party of Georgia event in 1991, Williams talks about libertarianism generally and relates his own moral arguments against state coercion. Williams also briefly suggests a few things he thinks libertarians should be doing if they want the libertarian movement to grow.

 


Bodies in Oklahoma Lake May Solve Decades-Old Mysteries

This Sept. 17, 2013, photo shows two cars recovered from Foss Lake, Okla. Laura Eastes / AP

  Two cars recovered from Foss Lake, Okla / Laura Eastes / AP

Authorities have recovered two vehicles from a lake in western Oklahoma containing the remains of six bodies that may be those of people missing for decades, the Associated Press reports.

According to reports in The Daily Elk Citian, one of the vehicles appears to match a Camaro that went missing in 1970 along with three teenagers from the small town of Sayre. The other car, an older-model Chevrolet, may be the same vehicle that disappeared along with Canute residents in the late 1950s or early 1960s. Reports originally stated that three bodies had been recovered from the Camaro and two from the Chevrolet; a local sheriff announced Wednesday that three bodies were also found in the Chevrolet. Read the rest of this entry »


Camille Paglia: “It remains baffling how anyone would think that Hillary Clinton is our party’s best chance”

Camille Paglia:
Camille Paglia (Credit: Michael Lionstar)

I can vividly remember the first time I read Camille Paglia. I was visiting New York with my mom during college and we happened across “Vamps and Tramps” at a bookstore near our hotel. Lying in neighboring twin beds, I read passages out loud to her. Explosive things like, “Patriarchy, routinely blamed for everything, produced the birth control pill, which did more to free contemporary women than feminism itself.” I didn’t always agree with Paglia, but I enjoyed her as a challenging provocateur.

I still have that copy of the book. There are asterisks in the margins, double-underlined sentences and circled paragraphs. Reading it was a satisfying rebellion against the line-toeing women’s studies classes I was taking at the time — and at a college with an infamously anti-porn professor, no less. Since then, I have moments of genuine outrage and fury over Paglia’s writing and public commentary (see: thisthis and this, for examples of why) — but she is still compelling and occasionally brilliant. The truth is that many people still want to hear what she has to say — about everything from BDSM to Lady Gaga.

The paperback release last week of her book “Glittering Images: A Journey Through Art From Egypt to Star Wars” — which Salon interviewed her about last year, and which is an example of Paglia at her intellectual best and an antidote to her birther moments — is a great excuse to check back in with the so-called bete noire of feminism. I spoke with Paglia by email about contemporary feminism, Anthony Weiner and the “end of men.”

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Coulter Derangement Syndrome

Good item by Kathy Shaidle 

Mugged and Ann Coulter Derangement Syndrome, Part 2:

Arguing with Coulter-haters is futile because their reaction to her is visceral, not logical

Last week, I talked about Ann Coulter’s new book Mugged: Racial Demagoguery from the Seventies to Obama .

Like all her books, this one is difficult to write about in a thousand words or less.

They’re always packed with quotable quotes, shocking discoveries from MSM archives, little-known historical nuggets — and infuriating stylistic tics like speed-bumping serious arguments with sarcastic, and sometimes obtuse, jokes.

So I’m back with more about Mugged, along with an investigation into what I call Coulter Derangement Syndrome, or CDS.

You know what I mean:Ann Coulter’s very existence sets millions of folks off.

Some of those people even call themselves conservative.

What’s that about?

And how does CDS impact the reception for, and potential impact of, Mugged?

More

via PJ Lifestyle