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[VIDEO] Should a Creative Professional Have the Freedom to Decline Work that Conflicts with their Conscience or Beliefs?

Everyone agreed that a creative professional should have the foundational freedom to decline work that conflicts with their conscience or beliefs. But, when faced with a situation that goes against current cultural expectations, like a Christian photographer declining to promote a same-sex wedding, the gears start grinding. If a law that forces someone to promote something against their beliefs is so laughable, so unimaginable…then why is it so difficult to extend the same freedom to a Christian creative professional?

Via Mollie Z. Hemingway, Twitter

 

 

 

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This Is What Happens When You Blow Soap Bubbles at -9°C (15,8°F)

When the weather forecast announced about the unexpected cold from -9°C to -12°C last week, Washington-based photographer Angela Kelly decided to take an advantage of it in one truly creative way. Together with her 7-year-old son, Kelly combined the home-based remedies – dish soap, karo syrup, and water – and went out to blow bubbles and take pictures as they freeze and melt.

frozen-bubbles-angela-kelly-1

Soon the two adventurers found themselves in awe while watching the frost create magical patterns in the freezing bubbles. The smaller ones would freeze momentarily, simply mid-air, and then they would fall down and scatter like thin glass chips. The bigger ones would manage to freeze more slowly on the surface, giving the photographer a chance to catch the artworks of the frost on camera.

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No Charges for Detroit Cop who Snatched Phone from Reporter, Stole SIM Card, so it Could “Not be Used as a Weapon”

By Carlos Miller

The Detroit cop who snatched a reporter’s smartphone so it could “not be used as a weapon” as she video recorded an arrest last month, returning it to her without a SIM card after a six-hour detainment, will not be criminally charged.

But the Detroit Police Department assures us it is conducting its own investigation.

However, it’s been more than a month and all it takes is 35 seconds in the video to see Lamar Penn clearly violated her Constitutional rights.

So we can pretty much expect him to be promoted soon.

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Vertical Hong Kong

ByRosa de Acosta

Hong Kong is famed for its skyline, but graphic artist and photographer Romain Jacquet-Lagrèze captures a different vision of the city: looking up.

In his “Vertical Horizon” project, the 26-year-old Frenchman photographs the city’s vertical angles through a wide-angle Sigma lens with a 10 mm focal length. The lens, he says, avoids distorting the urban landscape’s straight lines.

“Fisheye lenses bend the edges of the photos to make it curvy, while my lens doesn’t,” he said. “I think it fits better architectural shots and it’s more faithful to reality.”

Mr. Jacquet-Lagrèze arrived in Hong Kong in 2009 and bought his first single-lens reflex camera the following year. He started shooting vertical images in 2011, and in early 2012 decided to capture as much of the city as possible.

The project, now a book, comprises 80 photos taken between January and July of that year. A dozen of them are currently being displayed in Hong Kong’s Tsim Sha Tsui district as part of Le French May cultural festival.

Images were taken from the ground at eye level, a height that reinforces the viewer’s feeling of immersion and verticality. But, the photographer notes, looking up at the sky sometimes has its risks.

“Many times I have to stand in the middle of the road, but I’m cautious and haven’t suffered any accidents,” he said.

When he needs to hold his camera still, for instance for night shots, “I use what I find around me: a sign, a chair, a sidewalk fence,” he added. “I try to avoid using the tripod.”

As for what motivates him to take pictures?

“Hong Kong is an incredible source of inspiration to me,” he said, adding that photography is “the best way to share my feelings.”

“Vertical Horizon” is on view through June 24 at Hotel Panorama by Rhombus

via  Scene Asia – WSJ.