[PHOTO] Reverdy, Picasso, Cocteau and Brassaï in Picasso’s Studio at rue des Grands Augustins, Paris, 1944 by Brassaï

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Reverdy, Picasso, Cocteau and Brassaï in Picasso’s studio at rue des Grands Augustins, Paris, 1944 by Brassaï


Picasso: Guernica

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Jacqueline Roque: Picasso’s Wife, Love & Muse

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“She thought he was God and he thought he was God. The two of them were in love with him.” 

– Barbara Rose

Carol Kino writes: Think of Picasso, and it’s impossible not to envision the women he loved, tormented and painted, like Fernande Olivier, whose distorted features are indelibly associated with early cubism, or Dora600full-jacqueline-roque Maar, often depicted weeping, or Marie-Thérèse Walter, whose face and body the artist sundered so violently during his surrealist years.

“It began in 1952 when the 72-year-old artist, one of the most famous people in France, met the 27-year-old Roque at a pottery studio in Vallauris. He was making ceramics there, and she was a salesgirl.”

“For me, there are only two kinds of women—goddesses and doormats,” he told his postwar partner, Françoise Gilot, as she recounted in Life with Picasso, her 1964 memoir.

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“Overall, however sexualized or aggressive Picasso’s characterization, there is also a serene, joyful quality to the work. Perhaps that’s because, as Duncan recalls today, the couple’s love for each other was abundantly evident.”

Since Picasso’s death in 1973, the works emerging from these liaisons—and the gripping tales behind them—have provided fodder for countless museum and gallery shows.

In the past three years alone, Gagosian Gallery, in conjunction with the Picasso biographer John Richardson, mounted two well-received New York exhibitions, Picasso and Marie-Thérèse: L’Amour Fou in 2011, and Picasso and Françoise Gilot in 2012. (On October 28, the gallery will open Picasso & the Camera, curated, like the others, by Richardson.)

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“There are more portraits of Jacqueline than any other woman in Picasso’s life. The range of interpretation of her image is quite extraordinary.”

— Arne Glimcher, Pace’s founder

Now Pace Gallery, which has presented many Picasso shows of its own, will focus an extensive, two-gallery exhibitionaround the least celebrated and most controversial of the artist’s amours, Jacqueline Roque, a dark-haired divorcée 45 years the artist’s junior, who became his second wife in 1961.

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“It is so free and full of love. Jacqueline created peace for him.  That did not happen before.”

— Guggenheim Museum curator and Picasso scholar Carmen Giménez

Their relationship endured for more than 20 years, until Picasso’s death at 91, making Jacqueline, who took his name when they married, his longest-lasting consort and most persistent muse. Yet she has inspired only a few exhibitions. The last was in 2006, at the Kunst Museum Pablo Picasso in Münster, Germany. Read the rest of this entry »


Picasso’s ‘Le Tricorne’ To Be Removed From Four Seasons For Wall Renovations

inancially troubled French entertainment conglomerate who owns the tapestry, has asked auction houses for proposals to sell its prized modern art collection. (Photo by Matthew Peyton/Getty Images)

Financially troubled French entertainment conglomerate who owns the tapestry, has asked auction houses for proposals to sell its prized modern art collection. (Photo by Matthew Peyton/Getty Images)

For over half a century, New York City’s Four Seasons restaurant has been a place where Picasso meets the power lunch.

“I’ve seen a tremendous amount of reservations, a tremendous number of people coming to see the Picasso for the final time.”

But the pairing between one of the artist’s biggest paintings and one of New York’s most illustrious eateries is due to end Sunday. The unusual artwork – a painted stage curtain – is to be eased off its wall and moved to a museum.

“It’s spectacular. It’s huge, it’s colorful, it’s meaningful. I mean, it’s an outstanding artist.”

One of the restaurant’s managing partners, Julian Niccolini, told WCBS 880’s Monica Miller business has been strong, with man observers wanting a last look at the water color completed in 1919.

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Picasso Painting Reveals Hidden Man

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WASHINGTON — Scientists and art experts have found a hidden painting beneath one of Pablo Picasso‘s first masterpieces, “The Blue Room,” using advances in infrared imagery to reveal a bow-tied man with his face resting on his hand.

Now the question that conservators at The Phillips Collection in Washington hope to answer is simply: Who is he?

It’s a mystery that’s fueling new research about the 1901 painting created early in Picasso’s career while he was working in Paris at the start of his distinctive blue period of melancholy subjects.

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“The Blue Room,” as seen above, was one of Picasso’s first masterpieces. He painted it while he was working in Paris at the start of his distinctive blue period of melancholy subjects. Image: The Phillips Collection/Associated Press

Curators and conservators revealed their findings for the first time to The Associated Press last week. Over the past five years, experts from The Phillips Collection, National Gallery of Art, Cornell University and Delaware’s Winterthur Museum have developed a clearer image of the mystery picture under the surface. It’s a portrait of an unknown man painted in a vertical composition by one of the 20th century’s great artists.

Advances in infrared imagery reveal a bow-tied man with his face resting on his hand, with three rings on his fingers. Image: The Phillips Collection/Associated Press

Advances in infrared imagery reveal a bow-tied man with his face resting on his hand, with three rings on his fingers. Image: The Phillips Collection/Associated Press

“It’s really one of those moments that really makes what you do special,” said Patricia Favero, the conservator at The Phillips Collection who pieced together the best infrared image yet of the man’s face. “The second reaction was, ‘well, who is it?’ We’re still working on answering that question.”

Patricia Favero, associate conservator at The Phillips Collection, shows off an image of a man found underneath one of Picasso's first masterpieces, "The Blue Room," on Tuesday, June 10, 2014, in Washington. Image: Evan Vucci/Associated Press

Patricia Favero, associate conservator at The Phillips Collection, shows off an image of a man found underneath one of Picasso’s first masterpieces, “The Blue Room”.  Image: Evan Vucci/Associated Press

In 2008, improved infrared imagery revealed for the first time a man’s bearded face resting on his hand with three rings on his fingers. He’s dressed in a jacket and bow tie. A technical analysis confirmed the hidden portrait is a work Picasso likely painted just before “The Blue Room,” curators said. After the portrait was discovered, conservators have been using other technology to scan the painting for further insights. Read the rest of this entry »


Monet, Other Art from Big Collectors Lead Auctions

Claude Monet's "Water Lilies" from the Huguette Clark collection.  (AP Photo/Christie's)

Claude Monet’s “Water Lilies” from the Huguette Clark collection. (AP Photo/Christie’s)

NEW YORK (AP) — Works from the estates of heiress Huguette Clark, Edgar Bronfman and other major collectors are among the highlights leading the spring art auctions in New York City, including a Monet painting that’s been out of the public eye for decades.

The anticipated auction season begins Tuesday evening with the sale of impressionist and modern art at Christie’s, which expects to raise a total of more than $245 million.

Among the top lots is Claude Monet’s shimmering “Water Lilies.” The 1907 work of Monet’s beloved garden in Giverny, France, has not been publicly exhibited since 1926 and is estimated to sell for $25 million to $35 million.

Pierre-Auguste Renoir‘s “Young Women Playing Badminton” is another highlight expected to sell for between $10 million and $15 million. Read the rest of this entry »


BOOKS: A True Picture of Picasso

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The acuity of TJ Clark’s thought, allied to his sweeping breadth of reference, makes him the ideal interrogator of Picasso, argues John Banville

Picasso and Truth: From Cubism to Guernica

For The Irish TimesJohn Banville writes:  At the heart of this wonderful book there is a telling passage in which the author quotes Picasso remarking to a friend that he preferred his painting The Three Dancers of 1925 to the later and more publicly ambitious Guernica.

5145gmodHbL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_“It [the Dancers] was painted as a picture, without ulterior motive,” Picasso said. Clark finds this puzzling, and wonders if the painter meant that “the work happened essentially without him”, and calls to his aid Rimbaud on alienation from the self. Surely, however, the matter is simple. The Three Dancers is a fearsome, indeed a savage, work, but it is pure painting; Guernica, for all its violence and power, was intended as a political statement as well as a work of art, and for that reason it is, essentially, kitsch.

One does not lightly lay such a charge against one of the modern world’s most revered cultural artefacts. However, artists of Picasso’s type, few though they be, are always in danger of imagining that because they have achieved critical success and earned much money and fame, they must have profound things to say about the public life of their times. The inevitable result is either fatuity or bombast, or both. Georges Braque, co-deliverer with Picasso of the coup de grâce to traditional European painting, summed up the matter when he was asked in old age for his opinion of his friend and said, “Pablo? Oh, Pablo used to be a good painter; now he’s just a genius.”

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Comrade Picasso: The man and the political myth

Picasso's 'Guernica' on view at the Reina Sofia museum in Madrid. Photo: Getty

‘Guernica’ on view at the Reina Sofia museum in Madrid. Photo: Getty

Pablo Picasso has long been hailed as an ardent member of the left and an advocate for peace. New research into his relationship to the Franco regime suggests the need for revision, and an examination of our motives.

JONATHAN VERNON writes: One would expect a game of word association on a busy street to match many a ‘Picasso’ with ‘Guernica’. Commissioned for the Spanish Republican Pavilion at the 1937 Paris World’s Fair, Guernica took as its subject the aerial bombardment of the eponymous Basque town. Heinkel bombers flying for General Franco had razed it to the ground across three days earlier that year. The visual language Picasso wrought from that event gave form to human suffering with unparalleled potency. Read the rest of this entry »


The Picasso Effect

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LES DEMOISELLES D’AVIGNON; PABLO PICASSO

What The Success of Cubism Teaches Us About Radical Innovation

Paris, 1907. In a ramshackle studio in Montmartre, a twenty-six year-old Spanish artist presented the painting he had been working on day and night for the best part of a year to a small group of fellow artists, dealers and friends. They were visibly aghast.

One considered the work “a veritable cataclysm”. Another concluded that its creator must be on the brink of suicide. None could foresee that it would one day be considered the most influential artwork of the twentieth century.

The painting, then untitled, was later to become known as Les Demoiselles d’Avignon. It is credited as the first work of Cubism, and the catalyst for a revolution in Western art and culture.

The reaction of its first viewers that day was understandable. Les Demoiselles was ugly, chaotic and confusing: everything art was not supposed to be. It represented a wrenching, violent rupture with artistic convention. It flouted laws of perspective, representation and beauty that had endured for over four hundred years.

In a predictable world, Les Demoiselles would have been regarded as a regrettable aberration and quickly forgotten. Yet within a few years, Cubism had become the dominant art movement in Europe, and Cubist artists were commanding sky-high prices for their work.

The painting’s creator, at the time barely known outside of Montmartre, went on to become the most famous artist in the world. The name “Pablo Picasso” became synonymous with “genius”.

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