PANTSUIT REPORT UPDATE: Judicial Watch Sues On Clinton Cover-Up

closeup-Hillary

JW Launches New Lawsuit over Clinton Cover-Up

Revelations this week lead one to wonder not so much whether Hillary Clinton can win the PANTSUIT-REPORTDemocratic nomination for president, but whether she can stay out of jail.  Last week, we learned about apparent Clinton, Inc. tax fraud, bribery and money laundering to help Putin corner America’s uranium market, and abuse of office to reward funders of the Clinton Cash Machine – not to mention Judicial Watch’s bombshell of untoward Saudi influence and corruption in Hillary Clinton’s State Department. This week, we received more news about apparent money laundering out of India; lies by Clinton, Inc. about more Putin-connected contributions out of Canada; and more cover-up from another Hillary operation that focused on health care.

[Also see – Frankenhillary: Bad at almost everything—and winning by Daniel Halper]

JW’s chief investigative reporter brought us up to date with more reporting about yet another Clinton front:

Then there is Teneo Holdings, a global consulting firm with deep Clinton connections. Teneo serves as a kind of private-enterprise satellite to Clinton Inc. Doug Band, Mr. Clinton’s right-hand man for many years, is a 12-hillary-clinton-email.w245.h368Teneo founder. Huma Abedin, Mrs. Clinton’s right-hand woman for many years, was a senior advisor to Teneo at the same time she held a top position as part of Mrs. Clinton’s inner circle at the State Department. Bill Clinton was both a paid adviser to Teneo and a client. Secretary of State Clinton’s former Economic Envoy to Northern Ireland, Declan Kelly, is a Teneo co-founder and CEO.

I am not naïve about the difficulty of prosecuting Hillary Clinton over this scandal.  The Wall Street Journal had a major story yesterday about how American banks and other corporations are complaining about the Obama Justice Department’s strict interpretation of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, which prohibits bribes of foreign officials.  A Justice Department that would, correctly or incorrectly, ride herd on American companies engaged in alleged bribery of foreign officials has yet to move against Hillary Clinton over series of apparent crimes, including bribes she and her whole family were in on from foreign governments!

Kudos to our friend Peter Schweizer of the Government Accountability Institute whose new book has done so much to hold the Clinton machine accountable (“Clinton Cash: The Untold Story of How and Why Foreign Governments and Businesses Helped Make Bill and Hillary Rich”) Schweizer, I’m told, made smart use of our documents in his soon-to-be released book, which describes how money was funneled through the Clinton Foundation by foreign governments while Hillary Clinton was serving as secretary of state. Read the rest of this entry »


Scott Walker’s Righteous Victory in Wisconsin

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker Associated Press

The Editors, National Review: We are halfway there: On Friday, the state assembly of Wisconsin voted to make the state the 25th to pass right-to-work legislation, and Governor Scott Walker is expected to sign the bill with some satisfaction. That’s 25 down, 25 to go. (Our optimism is not so unanchored as to consider the sorry case of the District of Columbia.)

[read the full text here, at National Review]

Right-to-work laws end the practice of union bosses’ enriching their organizations through a legal variety of extortion under which all workers are required to pay the equivalent of union dues, whether they wish to be represented by a particular union or do not. The traditional position of Democrats, toward whose campaign coffers a great deal of that money is destined, is that this practice is necessary to ensure “fairness” — that workers enjoy the unions’ protection whether they want it or not. But the correct term for an arrangement like that isn’t “fairness” — it is “protection racket,” and Governor Walker’s signature will put an end to this particular brand of racketeering.

laborAge

“The face of the American union member in 2015 is not a working man in a hardhat or Rosie the Riveter, but a bored DMV clerk twiddling his thumbs on a government-mandated break while a taxpayer waits six hours to renew a driver’s license.”

A great deal of attention is being paid, and will be paid, to what this means for the presidential aspirations of Wisconsin’s governor, who confronted and trounced entrenched public-sector interests and then trounced them again when they tried to recall him. Governor Walker is an impressive man offering a welcome infusion of ordinary good governance to the Republican presidential pageant, but the political concerns here are secondary. The most important consideration is the excision of a cancer from the American economy and the American body politic.

(Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

“Unions are not a mechanism by which the rights of ordinary workers are secured; they are a mechanism by which the enormous streams of taxpayers’ dollars shunted into inefficient and criminally wasteful bureaucracies are laundered into campaign donations and political muscle for Democrats.”

The prominent American labor unions mainly are in steep decline, but, because of certain legal privileges, they punch above their weight politically and economically; they are corrupt, sometimes in the formal legal sense and often the more general moral sense; they are an appendage of the Democratic party whose remarkably well-compensated bosses ransack their members’ paychecks in order to exchange political donations for political favors; and, perhaps most important, they are today a prominent presence mainly in the public sector… Read the rest of this entry »


Progress: Government Workers Cost 45% More Than Private Sector Workers

 writes:  The United States Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) announced on March 12th that the total cost of employing a state or local government worker is 45% more than an equivalent worker in the private sector.

For the month of December 2013, employers in private industry spent an average of $29.63 per employee hour worked, but the equivalent cost for a government worker averaged $42.89 per hour. Not only do government employees average 33% higher pay than those in the private sector, their pension and retirement benefit costs are now an incredible 254% higher also. Given that compensation formulas for federal, state, and local government are comparable, it should come as no surprise that this year spending by the U.S. government will exceed revenue by an all-time high of $744.2 billion, and our gross national debt is a stunning $18.5 trillion.

“Not only do government employees average 33% higher pay than those in the private sector, their pension and retirement benefit costs are now an incredible 254% higher also.”

The BLS reported that private employers spent $20.76 on average for wages and salaries, plus $8.87 for benefits per hour worked. State and local government paid $27.66 for wages and salaries, plus $15.23 for benefits per hour worked. Government employees cost 33% more in wages and 71% more in benefits. The biggest difference is that government pension costs are 254% higher than the private sector.

Read the rest of this entry »


Analysis: Why Government Doesn’t—and Can’t—Manage Resources Like a Private Business

soviet-Obama-icon

Government versus Private Resource Management: The Theory

Robert P. Murphy writes: According to a common but naïve worldview, there are objective, well-known techniques for producing various goods and services, and the consumer preferences regarding these outputs are also common knowledge. In such a worldview—which even many professional economists, in discussing policy, seem to hold—it seems only natural to conclude that government officials could improve upon the decentralized market outcome. After all, the government has access to the same “production function” as private firms, and if it decides to be the monopoly producer of a good or service, it can avoid wasteful advertising expenses and other redundancies. Such arguments were behind the proposals for outright “market socialism” in the era between World Wars I and II, and, to this day, they guide recommendations for heavy government regulation of “natural monopolies” such as utilities.

However, more-practical economists recognize the limits of their textbook diagrams with elegant marginal revenue and marginal cost curves. In reality, we operate in a world of uncertainty. The “least cost” method of producing a good or service is never obvious, nor is what consumers will be willing to pay for various items. In a famous lecture, “Competition as a Discovery Procedure,” Friedrich Hayek explained how markets in the real world stumble upon this hidden knowledge. Various people with access to different information make piecemeal discoveries and constantly modify their operations accordingly; they receive feedback from market prices in the form of profit or loss. Firms mimic particularly profitable innovations, and if a firm does not adapt quickly enough, it will go out of business. Hayek thus viewed competition as a process rather than a condition or end-state. The state of “perfect competition” described in the textbooks—which includes the property that all firms in an industry use the identical “least-cost” method of production—is actually something that would emerge over time onlybecause of the competitive rivalry between the firms, and only if the conditions in the real world remained static long enough for all firms to fully adapt.

Read the rest of this entry »


Priorities: Private sector has shrunk in 41 states under Obama

Zuma Press

A new way of measuring success? Not a bug, but a feature?    (Zuma Press)

Michael Bastasch writes: The Obama administration is painting a much rosier picture of American jobs than the data supports, two researchers claim.

They have been touting their recent study showing that nearly every state has seen its private sector shrink under the Obama administration.

“Our findings show that for many states, the impact of the recession and slow recovery on the private sector has been more severe than the official economic data indicates,” Keith Hall, a senior fellow at the free-market Mercatus Center, told The Daily Caller News Foundation.

Hall and fellow researcher Robert Greene found that 41 states saw their private sectors shrink from 2007 to 2012. Alabama, Arizona, Florida, Idaho and Nevada have seen the largest contractions in their respective private sectors — in 2012, Nevada’s has shrunk 13 percent below 2007 levels.

Read the rest of this entry »


The Daily Hammer

TheHammer

Krauthammer’s Take: HealthCare.gov Report ‘Makes You Wonder if These Guys Even Read Their Own Stuff’

Charles Krauthammer blasted the federal healthcare exchange Monday evening, especially the administration’s boast that the site’s team was operating “with private sector velocity and effectiveness.”

“It makes you wonder if these guys even read their own stuff,” Krauthammer said, especially as the website represents a “de-privatization, a nationalization of . . . one-sixth of the economy.”

“It could take eons to actually undo the bad information” insurance companies have received from the site’s backend, he said, “or [the info] is not reaching the insurers at all, in which case someone is going to show up on January the first thinking he has insurance who doesn’t and we’re going to have all hell break loose.”

National Review Online


Report: Government Workers ‘Absent’ 50% More Than Private-Sector Workers

tdy-130328-happy-worker_2p.TdyHorz3A government worker is 38 percent more likely to be absent from work for personal reasons or illnesses than a private-sector worker, and government workers miss 50 percent more of their usual work hours as a result of such absences than do private sector workers, according to data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Each month, the Census Bureau’s Current Population Survey collects information from 60,000 households, including information on employment status.  BLS uses this data to publish employment statistics. Read the rest of this entry »


It’s Time To Let Somebody Competent Run National Parks (Hint: Private Enterprise)

20131017-065850.jpg

J.D.Tuccille writes: The federal government has demonstrated the astounding ability to deal with its budget crunch by closing profitable operations like national parks, and thereby drown itself in red ink on its “money-saving” efforts. That’s right, closing the national parks cost about $450,000 in lost entrance fees and rentals, every day. That’s watching the bottom line, government-style. But even at the best of times, the federal government has proven itself a good steward of the national parks only when it lets somebody else do the work. Given the track record of government management of parks, and of parks managed by private contractors, maybe it’s time to relieve the feds of a burden to which they’ve proven themselves inadequate. Read the rest of this entry »


Shutdown Reality Check

Shutdown Reality Check