Spanish Poster for Alfred Hitchcock’s ‘Rear Window’, by Fernando Albericio, USA, 1954

indiscreta

Spanish one sheet for REAR WINDOW (Alfred Hitchcock, USA, 1954)

Designer: Fernando Albericio

Poster source: Heritage Auctions


OH YES: Alfred Hitchcock Action Figure

Mondo collaborated with artists Trevor Grove and Michael Norman to create this 1/6 scale collectible figure of filmmaker Alfred Hitchcock. The action figure includes:

Director’s Chair
2 Cigars (1 lit & 1 unlit)
Raven
Clapboard
Butcher Knife
4 Interchangeable Hands…(read more)

Hitchcock_1dssdfsdfsdf_465_697_intHitchcock_2sdfsdfsdfsdf_465_697_int

Source: Dangerous Minds


DON’T TELL NORMA: Psychobarn Constructed on the Met Museum’s Rooftop

cornelia-parker-roof-garden-commission-the-met-transitional-object-psychobarn-designboom-07

The fourth annual installation of commissioned work for the Metropolitan Museum of Art‘s Iris and B. Gerald Cantor roof garden has been revealed. this year’s site-specific installation follows french artist pierre huyghe’s animal and mineral landscape presented last year, and american artist dan graham’s ‘hedge two-way mirror walkabout’ in 2014.

The roof garden commission 2016: Cornelia Parker
video courtesy of the met

cornelia-parker-roof-garden-commission-the-met-transitional-object-psychobarn-designboom-02

the british artist has combines two iconic aspects of american architecture image by alex fradkin, courtesy of the artist

The large-scale sculpture reaches a height of nearly 30 feet, appearing to be a completely constructed house at first glance, but upon closer inspection, revealing itself as two façades propped up with scaffolding. fabricated from a deconstructed red barn taken from a farm in upstate new york, the scaled-down structure is both genuine and fictional, conjuring the psychological and emotional aspects that are associated with these two architectural typologies.

cornelia-parker-roof-garden-commission-the-met-transitional-object-psychobarn-designboom-02

the sculpture moves between the physical reality of the barn and the cinematic fiction of the ‘psycho’ house image by alex fradkin, courtesy of the artist

Additionally, parker has incorporated the red siding, wood floors, whitewashed posts, and corrugated steel roofing from an old barn. the title of refers to the psychoanalytic theory of transitional objects used by children to help negotiate their identity as separate from their parents.

cornelia-parker-roof-garden-commission-the-met-transitional-object-psychobarn-designboom-02

a classic red barn meets the ominous bates mansion from alfred hitchcock’s 1960 film psycho image by alex fradkin, courtesy of the artist

For the 2016 edition, british artist cornelia parker combines two iconic aspects of american architecture — the image of a classic red barn, and the ominous bates mansion from alfred hitchcock’s 1960 film psycho — for the installation ‘transitional object (psychobarn)’.

[See more here, at designboom.com]

‘I was very excited to find the original set from psycho was only two flats, all propped up from behind, like a stage set would be, and it was filmed from a particular angle so you only saw the house, side on,’parker says. ‘I’ve built the house in the same angle. I’ve tipped it into the corner, and then if you go around the back, you can see it’s all propped up and you realize it’s a façade. but I wanted it to be believable from this angle. so the roof garden becomes the garden of this house. so I like the idea of the private hedge around the met roof. and then hunkering in the corner is this sinister house.’

cornelia-parker-roof-garden-commission-the-met-transitional-object-psychobarn-designboom-02

the large-scale sculpture reaches a height of nearly 30 feet image by alex fradkin, courtesy of the artist

‘I collaborated with a restoration company, who go around america and they take down old barns,’ parker says. ‘so the roof of this house is made from the corrugated metal from the barn roof. the siding is made obviously from the siding of the barn. so this is the barn, reconfigured. so I quite like the idea of the barn being this quite wholesome thing, this, you know, lovely thing about the landscape and the countryside, and politicians like standing in front of red barns because it typifies wholesomeness. and then the psycho house is the opposite. it’s just all the dark psychological stuff you don’t really want to look at.’ Read the rest of this entry »


[VIDEO] The Hidden Trick in Almost Every Classic Hitchcock Scene

Bryan Menages writes: Hitchcock is the unquestioned master of suspense. But what is it about his scenes that makes them so gripping, and why do they stand up to repeated viewings, even when you know the twist?

To answer this, the Nerdwriter turned to blocking—how you position stuff and people in relation to each other—specifically, the blocking in an early interaction from Vertigo. In the lengthy scene, a retired detective (Jimmy Stewart) meets a shipping tycoon (Tom Helmore) in his office, where he’s about to be lied to quite a bit.

During the meeting, Hitchcock uses the chairs to suggest power, with the dominant party at any given time being physically higher than the seated party. Similarly, the back half of the room is slightly raised and blocked by partial walls, almost like a stage…(read more)

Source: sploid.gizmodo.com


[PHOTOS] On Set With Alfred Hitchcock

tumblr_nw2lfctHIo1s7n9hno5_500 tumblr_nw2lfctHIo1s7n9hno4_500 tumblr_nw2lfctHIo1s7n9hno3_1280 tumblr_nw2lfctHIo1s7n9hno2_1280

On set with Alfred Hitchcock – Amazing behind-the-scenes photos of the master at work. (more here)

Source: vintage everyday


Alfred Hitchcock: ‘The Birds’, 1963

4696898154_8ee7dbd2aa_bALFRED HITCHCOCK (DIR) PORTRAIT O/S

editor-commen-deskA few nights ago, I watched Alfred Hitchcock’s ‘The Birds‘, for the first time in decades. I wonder why? I’ve seen restored versions of Psycho, Read Window, and Vertigo multiple times, but for some reason I’d missed re-watching this one. It was a pleasure to see again. And to see Tippi Hedren with fresh eyes.

dvd-los-pajaros-the-birds-1963-alfred-hitchcock-14926-MLM20092175668_052014-F

I was surprised to discover a curious resemblance between actress Tippi Hedren, at age 33, and Paris Hilton, now 34. The resemblance is minor, but notable.

Paris+Hilton+Launches+New+Fragrance+Tease+gZXeHuCYGS2x

And I’m not the first to notice it. A brief Google search shows seekers asking if Tippi and Paris are related. (they are not) In the course of this, I also rediscovered that Tippi Hedren is the mother of actress Melanie Griffith. Born in 1957, Melanie Griffith recalls visiting the set during the filming of The Birds, in 1962, when she was a little girl.

5707_001812

I was also pleased to find that the earthy and vivacious brunette female co-star is Suzanne Pleshette, another detail I’d forgotten. She has features similar to Elizabeth Taylor, or a young Stockard Channing.

Notice, in the photo below, how the 33 year-old Hedren has similar features, or facial expression, to the 34-year old Paris Hilton. See a similarity? I think it’s there.

tippi

Since we all know the story, and suspense isn’t a factor, I was free to pay closer attention to Tippi Hedren‘s performance, and to the interpersonal drama between the main characters, played by Rod Taylor, Jessica Tandy, and Suzanne Pleshette.

What a strange, dark, pensive, Freudian, romantic-erotic narrative! Where much is left unsaid, but implied. Jealousy, loneliness, abandonment, flirtation, hostility, attraction, are all explored, but not resolved. I’ve always thought of Vertigo as being the most neurotic, sexually obsessed, repressed, fixated story in Hitchock’s canon, but I had underestimated the peculiar storyline of The Birds. Before the actual birds take over the story, there’s a lot of familial and romantic turbulence. And the cast is wonderful.

birds002

Tippi Hedren looks so elegant, mischievous, and glamorous, one can see why Hitchcock selected the untrained model, fixated on her, and elevated her to movie star. Much is written about Hitchock’s abusive, controlling personality, and troubles with female leads, no need to cover that here, Hedren was no exception. Leaving all that aside, it was a pleasure to simply marvel at how lovingly photographed the neophyte actress is, and how well-crafted the film is. The moody San Francisco and northern California seaside locations, the special effects, the sound design (no music, only bird sounds make up the film’s score) the cinematography…besides being one of the most famous horror movies of all time, it’s also a terrific early 1960s time-capsule. Next time you watch it? Forget about the birds, and follow the other elements of the story. Perhaps you’ll find it as rewarding as I did.

Las_5_mejores_pel_culas_de_Alfred_Hitchcock_V_rtigo_La_ventana_indiscreta_Los_p_jaros_Psicosis_Atrapa_un_ladr_n_1_birds04birds10 TheBirds1thelovebirds1pdvd_030 Read the rest of this entry »


[BOOKS] Hitchcock: The Fine Art of Fear

alfred-hitchcockbday

Robert Nason writes: In Alfred Hitchcock’s films, the lack of information—or the possession of it—can have deadly consequences. The titles are revealing: “Suspicion” (1941), “Notorious” (1946), “The Man Who Knew Too Much” (1934, 1956). In his concise, insightful book on the director, Michael Wood asserts that in Hitchcock’s films there are “only three options: to know too little, to know too much . . . and to know a whole lot that is entirely plausible and completely wrong.”

“Some claim that Hitch was a sadist who took ‘pleasure in seeing beautiful women in harm’s way.’ Mr. Wood argues that Hitchcock worked out his own fears on film: ‘Far from enjoying the torments of these women at risk, he identified with them.'”

Hitchcock was born on Aug. 13, 1899, the son of a greengrocer. Members of this economic class, Mr. Wood says, were suspicious of the posh people above them and the unruly ones below. Hitchcock’s hitchcock-bookfilms would abound with upper-class villains and fearful mobs. As a Catholic, Hitchcock was an outsider in Protestant England; he would later be an English outsider in America.

[Order Michael Wood’s book “Alfred Hitchcock: The Man Who Knew Too Much” from Amazon.com]

Shy, chubby and intelligent, the young Hitchcock had few friends. He preferred attending sensational London trials—and movies. Instead of fan magazines, Hitch—as he preferred to be called—avidly read technical film journals and landed a job designing movie title cards. As a fledging director of silents, he was influenced by the shadowy lighting and dynamic camera movements of German Expressionist cinema. He would combine their beauty and atmosphere of anxiety with a dash of black humor and a blonde in jeopardy. All the ingredients were in place for his third feature, “The Lodger” (1927), the film “in which he became Hitchcock,” as Mr. Wood puts it. The title character is suspected by everyone as a notorious-posterJack-the-Ripperish killer. Is he or isn’t he? “Innocence and guilt,” Mr. Wood notes, “leave many of the same traces.”

When Hitchcock came to Hollywood in 1939, he had already imparted alarming warnings to his British countrymen in a recent string of thrillers. He would send the same message to Americans: A menace threatened not only Great Britain and the United States but civilization as a whole. In many of Hitchcock’s great British films, from “The 39 Steps” (1935) to “The Lady Vanishes” (1938), we’re usually not told who the spies are working for, but there’s little doubt who the enemy is. Likewise, in his early Hollywood film “Foreign Correspondent” (1940), the “peace activist,” suavely played by Herbert Marshall, is actually a spy working for the unnamed foe.

[Read the full story here, at WSJ]

While some Hitchcock films deal with global threats, the truly frightening works dwell upon more intimate dangers. In the film that was the director’s personal favorite, “Shadow of a Doubt” (1943), pshychoJoseph Cotton plays a dapper killer of wealthy women, proving that evil could lurk even in anytown America. In “Strangers on a Train” (1951) and “Rear Window” (1954), brutal murders occur, respectively, in an amusement park and a middle-class apartment building. Hitchcock became an American citizen in 1955, the same year that his hit television program “Alfred Hitchcock Presents” debuted. Mr. Wood suggests that the habitually fearful Hitchcock worried about “losing what he most cared about” at the pinnacle of his career, and this contributed to the richness of his confident yet melancholy films during the next few years.

Mr. Wood devotes more space to “Vertigo” (1958) than to any other Hitchcock film. In this masterpiece of misinformation and obsession, Jimmy Stewartplays a retired private investigator fascinated by a suicidal woman who is hardly who she seems to be. In “North by Northwest” (1959), Cary Grant plays Roger Thornhill, a shallow Madison Avenue advertising man thought by enemy spies to be an American intelligence officer who in fact doesn’t exist. Read the rest of this entry »