Advertisements

The Bush Dilemma: Too Much Supply, Not Enough Demand

jeb-mom-fix
Nick Gass reports: Trump and Carson continue to lead the GOP field.

Jeb Bush’s support among Republicans nationally has plummeted to the low single digits in the latest Quinnipiac University survey released Wednesday, as the former Florida governor’s campaign seeks to hit refresh with its “Jeb Can Fix It” tour.

Donald Trump and Ben Carson, meanwhile, continued to lead the field, with Carson outperforming Hillary Clinton in a hypothetical general-election matchup.

bush-spiral-drudge

In the latest poll, conducted after last week’s third GOP debate in which Bush delivered a mediocre performance, just 4 percent of Republican and independent Republican-leaning voters said they would support Bush in their state’s primary. In the September survey, Bush earned 10 percent, trailing Trump, Carson and Carly Fiorina. And in terms of favorability, no one polled lower than Bush, at a net-negative of 33 points. Just 25 percent of all registered voters surveyed said they had a positive opinion of him, while 58 percent said they had a negative one.

For its part, the Bush campaign has tried to manage expectations among the media.

“FYI political press corps. Jeb’s going to have a few weeks of bad polls,” campaign communications director Tim Miller tweeted Monday. “Comebacks take time, we recognize and are prepared for that.”

[Read the full story here, at POLITICO]

Trump earned 24 percent from Republican voters this time, while Carson moved into a virtual tie at 23 percent. Florida Sen. Marco Rubio jumped into third place with 14 percent, followed by Texas Sen. Ted Cruz with 13 percent. Other candidates took in 3 percent or less support, with 9 percent undecided.

Among Democratic and Democratic-leaning independent voters, Clinton bested Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders to the tune of 53 percent to 35 percent, a 10-point jump for both from the same poll in September. Read the rest of this entry »

Advertisements

Mayor de Blasio Scores Big Win for New York!

New-York-Poll-Observer-suck

That was the finding of a new Quinnipiac University Poll released this afternoon, which found that only 33 percent of New York City voters rated the quality of life here as “very good” or “good”—the lowest number ever measured by the university, whose trend line for the question dates back to 1997. And 48 percent of voters said quality of life has dropped in the last few years.

“Only 33 percent of New York City voters rated the quality of life here as “very good” or “good”—the lowest number ever measured by the university, whose trend line for the question dates back to 1997.”

That dismal outlook comes just a day after Mr. de Blasio earned his all-time-lowest approval rating in a Quinnipiac Poll released yesterday—which his administration noted came after he was hammered by negative advertisements during his failed attempt to cap Uber. And it comes on the same day the mayor is seeking to offer one solution to quality of life complaints: a comprehensive plan to tackle the issue of homelessness.

While Mr. de Blasio’s numbers are at a record-low, the number of New Yorkers who think crime is a “very serious” problem in New York City is at an all-time high —48 percent. That’s higher than the oldest entry on Quinnipiac’s trend line for that question: in 1999, only 35 percent of voters said crime was “very serious.” Read the rest of this entry »


Glenn Reynolds: Higher Ed Becoming a Joke

-AP-COLLEGE-OF-BUSINESS-GRADUATION

(Photo: Gretchen Ertl, AP Images for New England College of Business)

American colleges are fraught with petty politics and bad economics

For USA TodayGlenn Reynolds writes: As college graduates around the country fling their caps into the air, college and university administrators are ending the year in a less positive state. It has been a tough year for higher education in America, and it’s not especially likely that next year will be a lot better. As an industry, higher education is beset with problems, problems that for the most part aren’t being addressed.

[Glenn Reynolds‘ book The New School: How the Information Age Will Save American Education from Itself is available at Amazon]

One set of problems is economic. With tuitions climbing, and graduates’ salariesstagnant, students (and parents) are becoming less willing to pay top dollar. This has caused some schools — especially expensive private institutions that lack first-class reputations — to face real hardships. Yeshiva University’s bonds have beendowngraded to the status of junk. Credit downgrades have also hit several elite liberal arts colleges. Other private schools, such as Quinnipiac College, are actuallylaying off faculty. Georgetown in Kentucky cut faculty by 20%.

“If I understand college administrators correctly, colleges are hotbeds of racism and rape that everyone should be able to attend.”

— IowaHawk

Even fancy schools such as Harvard and Dartmouth have seen applications decline, with Dartmouth’s dropping 14% last year, a truly staggering number.

It’s no picnic for public institutions either. “There have been 21 downgrades of public colleges and universities this year but no upgrades,” reported Inside Higher Ed. It’s gotten so bad that schools are even closing their gender studies centers, a once-sacrosanct kind of spending. Read the rest of this entry »


Concealed Carry Means Fewer Murders, Says New Study

Flashbang bra for Christmas? ArmedinHeels

Flashbang bra for Christmas? ArmedinHeels

Ronald Bailey reports: Quinnipiac University economist Mark Gius has published a new study, “An examination of the effects of concealed weapons laws and assault weapons bans on state-level murder rates,” in the journal Applied Economics Letters. From the abstract:

The purpose of the present study is to determine the effects of state-level assault weapons bans and concealed weapons laws on state-level murder rates. Using data for the period 1980 to 2009 and controlling for state and year fixed effects, the results of the present study suggest that states with restrictions on the carrying of concealed weapons had higher gun-related murder rates than other states. It was also found that assault weapons bans did not significantly affect murder rates at the state level. These results suggest that restrictive concealed weapons laws may cause an increase in gun-related murders at the state level. The results of this study are consistent with some prior research in this area, most notably Lott and Mustard (1997).

Intriguing.

For more background: The most recent Reason-Rupe poll reports that 63 percent of Americans don’t believe that stricter gun laws would keep weapons out of the hands of criminals.

Hit & Run : Reason.com