FORWARD! U.S. Aerospace Command Moving Comms Gear Back to Cold War Bunker

NORAD

The Cheyenne mountain bunker is a half-acre cavern carved into a mountain in the 1960s that was designed to withstand a Soviet nuclear attack.

Washington (AFP) – The US military command that scans North America’s skies for enemy missiles and aircraft plans to move its communications gear to a Cold War-era mountain bunker, officers said.

The shift to the Cheyenne Mountain base in Colorado is designed to safeguard the command’s sensitive sensors and servers from a potential electromagnetic pulse (EMP) attack, military officers said.

pentagon

The Pentagon last week announced a $700 million contract with Raytheon Corporation to oversee the work for North American Aerospace Command (NORAD) and US Northern Command.

“My primary concern was…are we going to have the space inside the mountain for everybody who wants to move in there, and I’m not at liberty to discuss who’s moving in there.”

Admiral William Gortney, head of NORAD and Northern Command, said that “because of the very nature of the way that Cheyenne Mountain’s built, it’s EMP-hardened.”

US President Barack Obama attends a military briefing with US Ambassador to Afghanistan James Cunningham (L) at Bagram Air Field, north of Kabul, in Afghanistan, May 25, 2014. Photo: SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images

“And so, there’s a lot of movement to put capability into Cheyenne Mountain and to be able to communicate in there,” Gortney told reporters.

“A lot of the back office communications is being moved there.”

“My primary concern was… are we going to have the space inside the mountain for everybody who wants to move in there, and I’m not at liberty to discuss who’s moving in there,” he said.

The Cheyenne mountain bunker is a half-acre cavern carved into a mountain in the 1960s that was designed to withstand a Soviet nuclear attack. From inside the massive complex, airmen were poised to send warnings that could trigger the launch of nuclear missiles.

But in 2006, officials decided to move the headquarters of NORAD and US Northern Command from Cheyenne to Petersen Air Force base in Colorado Springs. The Cheyenne bunker was designated as an alternative command center if needed. Read the rest of this entry »


How Much Will a War With Syria Cost?

Photo: U.S. Navy (public domain), via Wikimedia Commons

Photo: U.S. Navy (public domain), via Wikimedia Commons

As the United States gets closer to a missile strike on Syria, there’s one pertinent question on many Americans’ minds: How much will this cost? Considering the wars with Iraq and Afghanistan cost more than $4 trillion according to a study by Harvard’s Kennedy school, and they negatively affected the economy, this is a very good question.

Millions in missiles

Before the missile strike on Syria became an issue, the Navy’s USS Nimitz, and its escorts, were scheduled to return from deployment. Now, however, they’ve been ordered to remain within striking distance of Syria, which alone costs an estimated $25 million per week. Further, each Tomahawk cruise missile likely to be fired on Syria costs an estimated $1.5 million each to replace. That’s great news for Raytheon (NYSE: RTN  ) , which builds the missile, but not for the Navy’s budget. Plus, if the U.S. fires missiles, that’ll add an additional $30 million per week for as long as the Navy’s Nimitz and Truman are engaged in combat. Read the rest of this entry »