LIBERAL HEADS EXPLODE: Kentucky’s New Lieutenant Governor Jenean Hampton

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John Fund continues:

…Both Bevin and Hampton are Tea Party activists who have never held elective office. Hampton’s path certainly represents triumph over adversity. Born in Detroit, the 57-year-old Hampton and her three sisters were raised by a single mom who lacked a high school education and couldn’t afford a television or a car.

Bobby Ellis/bellis@state-journal.com Lt. Gov. Candidate Jenean Hampton shakes hands with Jenny Goins during the ceremony to celebrate the Class of 2015 Veteran's Hall of Fame inductees.

Lt. Gov. Candidate Jenean Hampton shakes hands with Jenny Goins during the ceremony to celebrate the Class of 2015 Veteran’s Hall of Fame inductees.

But Hampton was determined to better herself. She graduated with a degree in industrial engineering and worked for five years in the automobile industry to pay off her college loans. She then joined the Air Force, retiring as a Captain.

[UPDATE – How Kentucky’s New Black Lieutenant Governor Became a Conservative – John Fund]

Jenean-Hampton-in-uniform

She earned an MBA from the University of Rochester, moved to Kentucky and became a plant manager in a corrugated packaging plant….(read more)

Source: National Review Online


THE PANTSUIT REPORT: Michael Wolraich’s Confession: ‘I Sorted Hillary Clinton’s Email’

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Natural language — the way people ordinarily speak and write — is notoriously difficult to parse

 writes: When Hillary Clinton released emails from her personal account last week, many assumed that her attorneys had personally reviewed the messages before sending them to the State Department, but that’s not what
happened. As detailed in her press statement, the review team used keyword searches to automatically filter over 60,000 messages, flagging about half as work related.PANTSUIT-REPORT

“I have absolute confidence that everything that could be in any way connected to work is now in the possession of the State Department,” Clinton declared.

I’m afraid that I don’t share her confidence, and I speak from experience. Twenty years ago, I used the same method to sort the Clinton administration’s email communications, including those of First Lady Hillary Clinton. It failed miserably.

Email did not exist when Congress established the Freedom of Information Act in 1967, and government officials did not originally consider electronic communications to be public records that they had to preserve and disseminate. On the last day of Ronald Reagan’s presidency, a group of organizations representing archivists and libraries sued the White House to prevent 12-hillary-clinton-email.w245.h368the administration from deleting email relating to the Iran-Contra scandal. A temporary injunction was issued, and the case wound its way through the courts until 1993, when a federal judge ordered President Bill Clinton to preserve all electronic communication under the Freedom of Information Act.

“Even after significant tweaking, I don’t recall achieving more than a 70 percent success rate, which is particularly poor when you consider that random sorting would yield 50 percent if the distribution were even.”

In 1994, I was 22 years old, fresh out of college and working as a computer programmer for a company called Information Management Consultants. IMC was one of many three-letter-acronym corporations that ring Washington’s famous beltway and feed off government contracts. I dressed in a gray J.C. Penney suit and programmed three-letter-acronym computer languages (SQL, 4GL) for three-letter-acronym federal agencies (IRS, OPM, DOI, OMB, DOD). It was dull work, made duller by my company’s decision to block employee access to the “World Wide Web” so that we would not be distracted from our work.

“Those were heady days for a young government IT contractor. We had a special office in Arlington, Virginia, where we were could dress casually while pursuing important, groundbreaking work for the President of the United States!”

One day a colleague invited me to join a mysterious new project for the Executive Office of the President (EOP). The White House had hired IMC to archive its email after the court ordered it to preserve electronic records. Few people had multiple email accounts back then and many federal employees used their work accounts for personal communication, so we had to figure out some way to distinguish work email from personal correspondence.roos

[Check out ‘s book “Unreasonable Men: Theodore Roosevelt and the Republican Rebels Who Created Progressive Politics” at Amazon.com]

Those were heady days for a young government IT contractor. We had a special office in Arlington, Virginia, where we were could dress casually while pursuing important, groundbreaking work for the President of the United States! We lounged around the conference table in our khakis and scrawled deep thoughts on the big whiteboard. Mostly, we wrote words: president, federal, treasury, treaty, China, Serbia, ambassador, military, classified, and so on. These were the keywords with which we hoped to flag all the work-related messages, or at least the vast majority. We included the names of federal officials, common misspellings, and, of course, numerous three-letter acronyms. Since I had a philosophy degree, the team leader asked me to design logic to make the search smarter, e.g., “white AND house.”

“To make sense of natural language, it’s not sufficient to recognize the words; you also need to understand grammar, appreciate nuance, interpret metaphors, grasp allusions…”

To test our algorithm, the administration gave us a batch of sample messages. They included official business, such as a debate about a public scandal in which an official traveled by federal helicopter to play golf, and less official business, such as a private love note between two staff members. We ran our algorithm and crossed our fingers. Read the rest of this entry »


Obama Sent No Representative to Memorial Mass for Beheaded Journalist James Foley

(CNSNews.com) – President Barack Obama sent no White House representative to the memorial Mass held yesterday in Rochester, New Hampshire, for James Foley, the American journalist beheaded by the Islamic State in Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS) terrorists.

Mourners packed Holy Rosary Catholic Church in Rochester, N.H., on Sunday for a memorial Mass for journalist James Foley, who was murdered by ISIS terrorists. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

Mourners packed Holy Rosary Catholic Church in Rochester, N.H., on Sunday for a memorial Mass for journalist James Foley, who was murdered by ISIS terrorists. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

President Obama, however, did send three White House aides to Monday’s funeral for Michael Brown, an 18-year-old African American fatally shot in an encounter with a white police officer in Ferguson, Mo.

“There was nobody that represented the White House.”

The memorial mass for James Foley took place Sunday at Our Lady of the Holy Rosary in Foley’s hometown. Connie Hammond, an administrative assistant at Holy Rosary, told CNSNews.com that no White House officials were in attendance. Read the rest of this entry »


This Day in History: Eastman Makes First Motion Picture Film

george-eastman John Kirshon writes:  One-hundred and twenty-six years ago, on March 26, 1885, the Eastman Dry Plate and Film Company of RochesterNew York, manufactured the first commercial motion picture film.

The company was co-founded by George Eastman, an American inventor and philanthropist who in his lifetime transformed photography from an expensive hobby into an inexpensive, popular pastime.

Born in Waterville, New York in 1854, the self-educated Eastman patented the first practical film in roll form in 1884, and perfected the Kodak camera, the first camera designed for roll film, four years later.

He founded the Eastman Kodak Company in Rochester in 1892. One of the first firms to mass-produce standardized photography equipment, it also made the flexible, transparent film, invented by Eastman in 1889, that was vital in the development of the movie business.

Read the rest of this entry »