‘Mad Men’ Memorabilia for Sale: Nearly 1,400 Props, Costumes in Online Auction

mad-men-premiere-don writes: AMC’s “Mad Men” may have driven off into the sunset, but now fans of the retro show will have a chance to buy props, wardrobe pieces and set decorations used in the series — including Don Draper’s suits and his 1965 Cadillac Coupe de Ville from the final season.

“Mad Men collectibles on offer include Joan’s emerald necklace, Stan Rizzo’s bongos; Bert Cooper’s tea set; plus a wide assortment of vintage barware, ashtrays, briefcases, luggage, lamps, carpets and period toys.”

Nearly 1,400 items from the Lionsgate-produced series will open for online bidding at ScreenBid, starting Friday, July 31, at 12 p.m. PT. Lots will begin closing Aug. 6.

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In addition to the Coupe de Ville (bids start at $1,500), items on the block include Draper’s Brooks Brothers suits, sunglasses and business cards; wardrobe, office accessories and personal effects for every major character including Peggy Olsen, Pete Campbell, Roger Sterling, Betty Draper and Joan Harris; Megan Draper’s wedding ring; and Don Draper’s Manhattan penthouse furnishings. Read the rest of this entry »


[PHOTOS] ‘Don Draper Staring Blankly’

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[Via Tumblr site Don Draper Staring Blankly]


Fictional Mad Men Character Roger Sterling To Be A Regular Guest On Spiegel/Goff Show

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We’re pleased to announce that fictional character on AMC’s “Mad Men” Roger Sterling will be a regular guest on the Spiegel and Goff Show. Sterling will appear every Tuesday at Noon during the baseball season to talk, make clever wisecracks, and enjoy a refreshing cocktail or two.

“Roger Sterling is one of the more interesting guys from the world of fictional advertising agencies,” said Jason Goff. “He’s got a renewed energy for Mad Men fans, who have been waiting for that pop, for that next big thing.”

Known for witty, zen-like sayings, skirt-chasing, and drinking on the job, Roger Sterling is as unique among fictional 1960s-era TV characters, and should bring great perspective to the show. Read the rest of this entry »


Speakeasy: ‘Mad Men’ Season Premiere, ‘Severance’: A Conversation

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Read it here, at SpeakeasyWSJ


[VIDEO] Sesame Street: Mad Men

And now eMC, the emotional movie channel, presents Mad Men. Mr. Draper is looking for solid ideas on the Happy Honey Bear account, ideas that are going to make him happy about honey.

 YouTube.


Mad Men: Advice from Roger Sterling

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Today’s Roger Sterling Moment

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Mad Men: Sterling Wisdom

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Here’s why Roger Sterling is the best character on ‘Mad Men’

John-SlatteryRoger Sterling, Zen Master of Sloth, King of Hip, Captain of Cool, Soothsayer of Sly One-Liners, most underrated character on Mad Men, finally gets his due.


[VIDEO] Robert Morse Singing ‘I Believe In You’ from ‘How to Succeed in Business…’ 1967

In honor of Morse’s magical musical final moments as Bert Cooper on Sunday night’s mid-season finale of Mad Men, Here’s Robert Morse the Broadway star, from half a century ago, singing the song he’ll always be identified with in the 1967 film version of “How To Succeed In Business Without Really Trying

YouTube


‘Mad Men’ Inside Baseball

BN-CQ609_mad_D_20140504191601Lawyer, Supreme Court advocate, and Mad Men aficianado Walter Dellinger decodes some hidden meaning in Sunday night’s episode. Not being a sports fan, I didn’t catch it.

It involves a critical moment in sports history in New York in 1969. Only fairly dedicated baseball fans, or those familiar with the history of New York, would ever make the connection. it’s unimportant to the story, except as a background detail. But it’s the kind of clue that’s meant to reward an observant viewer, like Walter Dellinger, who sees a link between the New York Mets and Don Draper‘s future.

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Season 7, Episode 4, ‘The Monolith’

For WSJ’s SpeakeasyWalter Dellinger writes:

“..the metaphor for his (coming) revival is not the new computer, but the 1969 New York Mets.  At his lowest point, Don finds a discarded Mets banner under his file cabinet.  He drops in the waste basket.  But the next time we see Don, he has retrieved the classic orange banner and hung it on the wall.

When he awakes from a drunken stupor, he sees it from upside down and stares at it.  And he calls Freddy to take the day off (from doing no work, anyway) to see a Mets game.

And so all you Don Draper fans who don’t follow baseball need to know that there is indeed hope for Don this season, at least if this deliberate invocation of the Mets has any meaning (and what on this show doesn’t?).  The New York Mets were relatively new to baseball and in their eighth season in 1969.  They had never had a winning season, and were at that point a metaphor for futility.  But in that year they became the “Miracle Mets” winning 100 games and upsetting the great Baltimore Orioles team to win the World Series…”

TV Recap – Speakeasy – WSJ

If Dellinger is right, and Don Draper’s fortunes are finally about to turn, it couldn’t come a moment too soon. After a nearly unbearable string of misfortunes, a downward spiral lasting throughout season 6, unwinding into season 7, Don self-destructive personality has worn out its welcome, for his partners and coworkers, but also for the viewers. I wonder how many of Mad Men’s original fans are still along for the ride. Read the rest of this entry »


What Mad Men Teaches Us About Money

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For Daily FinanceAnnalisa Kraft-Linder writes: Millions of Americans are addicted to “Mad Men,” the AMC drama chronicling the lives of the people at ad agency Sterling Cooper Draper Pryce. Enthralling us over seven seasons are their mostly sordid sex lives, boozy business lunches, snazzy apartments, period clothes and finned Cadillacs.

“They say money can’t buy happiness, but it sure as hell buys everything else.”

— Bob Benson

Although money is rarely addressed, suck-up Bob Benson of season six (James Wolk) sums up their attitudes neatly: “They say money can’t buy happiness, but it sure as hell buys everything else.” Here’s what else you can learn about money from the hit show, which wraps up this year.

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‘Happiness Is the … Freedom from Fear’

Agency creative director Don Draper (Jon Hamm) leads a complicated life. He had been on unscheduled leave after a major meltdown in front of the Hershey (HSY) clients. He conspires with his former secretary to keep his family in the dark about his out-of-work status. His relationship with his work and money is so tied in to the ’60s concept of the masculine breadwinner that on the April 27 episode he finally admits his fear to wife, Megan (Jessica Pare),”If you found out what happened, you wouldn’t look at me in the same way.”

“I’m just acknowledging that life, unlike this analysis, will eventually end, and someone else will get the bill.”

— Roger Sterling

Draper could have taken a job at another agency for less money but submits sheepishly to be part of the SCDP fold under humiliating conditions to keep up his lifestyle and win back Megan. Read the rest of this entry »


[REWIND] Julia Yost on Mad Men’s Megan

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One of the more involved and insightful deep-dish Mad Men pieces I’ve seen this season, from an unlikely source, it’s a pleasure to read TV show analysis this dedicated. If you’re a Don Draper fan like me, read the whole thing.

In advance of this Sunday night’s Mad Men, episode 4, here’s a look back at episode 3 by Julia Yost.

For First ThingsJulia Yost writes:

Are Don and Megan Draper finally over? In the major arc before the first commercial break, Don speaks long-distance to Megan’s agent and learns that Megan has been exhibiting desperate (stalker-like) behavior toward industry types in L.A. Don flies out unannounced in the middle of the week. Megan’s libidinal delight upon his arrival turns to melancholy as she reflects on her rejections (“It’s sunny here for everyone but me”) and then to outrage when she learns the reason for Don’s visit (“You came out here to, what, pull me out of a bathtub where I slit my wrists?”) and then to suspicion and accusation (“You’re never [in the office] when I call. … Who’s your new girl, Don?”—by which she means mistress, not secretary). Don confesses, not to having an affair, but to having been on leave from SC&P since Thanksgiving (it is now early spring). Megan is furious over the secrecy, and furious that all this time he could have been with her in L.A. but chose not to. She throws him out, with “This is the way it ends.”

I indulge in bald plot-summary here because I have waited so long in patience for these two to split up. As Megan ca. 1968-69, Jessica Paré is a tedious screen presence in hideous clothes. Their crackup has always seemed a foregone conclusion, given how impulsively Don proposed (at Disneyland!) in Season Four and how incapable he is of husband-like qualities (sustained honesty, loyalty, sobriety). The writers have been flirting with it since the midpoint of Season Five. Get on with it! A long-distance phone call later in the episode may or may not herald a rapprochement; let us hope not. Read the rest of this entry »


Vintage Mad Men: Classic Cinema-Style Posters for 10 Signature Episodes

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Darren Franich and Jef Castro match classic movie art style to Don Drapers world

[See the whole set of 10 posters]

EW.com


Mad Men Season 6: Creator Matthew Weiner On Don’s Bold Moves And Season 6 Conspiracy Theories

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Note: Do not read on if you have not yet seen the Season 6 finale of AMC’s “Mad Men,” titled “In Care Of.”

Could Don Draper finally be growing up?

Most fathers are not a mystery to their children; most adults are not quite so hobbled by tortured pasts. But most people are not Don Draper, who, in the course of “Mad Men’s” six seasons, has tried to shield his kids from the most basic truths about himself. Where he’s from, how he grew up, what kind of life he had: Those were all things that he lied about, to co-workers, clients and those closest to him. But as viewers saw in the show’s Season 6 finale (which I wrote about here), Don is in the process of shedding that false skin.

The final image of Season 6 was Draper showing his three children the house of ill repute in which he grew up. We don’t know yet if his bold gamble will pay off, or if his daughter Sally, who grew especially disenchanted with her father this season, will continue on her path of rebellion and barely-suppressed fury at her father.

Don also revealed the truth about his origins during a meeting with an important potential client, and everyone in the room was appropriately stunned. According to “Mad Men” creator and executive producer Matthew Weiner, however, Don’s behavior in the Hershey meeting is not what got him fired (or placed on leave). That meeting, shocking though it was, was “a very minor infraction in all this,” Weiner said. As he explained, the entire penultimate season of the show (and all the questionable behavior it contained) was meant to lead Don to the point where he felt he could — and had to — start to be at least partially truthful about himself to the people around him.

In the interview below, Weiner discusses the events that led Don to this moment, as well as his future (or lack thereof) at SC&P, the paths that Joan and Peggy took this season, the conspiracy theories surrounding the show and Megan Draper’s infamous “Sharon Tate” T-shirt, among other things.

This interview has been edited and slightly condensed.

Don went in to that Hershey meeting thinking they weren’t really serious about taking on an agency, so in a way, there wasn’t much at stake for him. But could you talk a little bit more about his motivations for coming clean about his past in that setting, especially given how his colleagues were likely to react?
I think that he is not thinking about his colleagues and I think that he is in a crisis. As you can tell, he’s planning on going to California; he has quit drinking. Ted has just told him that he wants to go to California, and I think a lot of what Ted said is resonating in his mind. But our whole goal for the season was to put Don in a position where he knew whether he was going to change or not. At least looking in the mirror and admitting who he was, in some ways, was going to make him feel better, and alleviate that anxiety that he has been feeling all year — [the anxiety] that led to him destroying his relationship with his daughter, that led to him destroying his business and his role in his business.

It’s not that the Hershey meeting has no stakes. It’s that the Hershey meeting actually has a very personal connection to him. You see him get up there and just lie his head off. And we know that everything he is saying isn’t true. We were sort of building to one line the whole season, where the client says, “Weren’t you a lucky little boy?” [In that moment, Don was] looking over at Ted and realizing that he was a liar and that he had to confess. That’s what I think that was: a confession.

Read the rest of this entry »