Seattle’s Socialist Experiment: When it Comes to the Impacts of a High Minimum Wage, a Picture is Worth a Thousand Words

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Erin ShannonErin-S-web-103cropw writes: This sign in a Seattle nail salon is a perfect illustration of the unintended consequences of forcing employers to pay an aritificially high minimum wage.

Contrary to the claim that employers can afford to pay their workers more and will just absorb the higher labor costs, Madison Avenue Nail Spa shows what really happens–employers find ways to mitigate those costs.  This business owner has decided to pass the extra costs to consumers.

“All of these employers are doing what they must in order to deal with a mandated wage that is higher than the value of the job.”

They aren’t alone. Ivars Salmon House is also raising prices.  Ivars is also implementing a 17% service charge in lieu of tips.  The Icon Grill in Seattle is taking a different strategy; they aren’t increasing prices, but instead eliminating three weeks of paid vacation. All employees will now only earn one week of paid vacation time; before Seattle’s new minimum wage law went into effect on April 1, some long-time employees of the restaurant received four weeks of paid vacation per year.

From the dustbin of history, the zombie socialists

From the dustbin of history, the zombie socialists

“All employees will now only earn one week of paid vacation time; before Seattle’s new minimum wage law went into effect on April 1, some long-time employees of the restaurant received four weeks of paid vacation per year.”

Then there is Z Pizza–that business is closing in August, leaving 12 workers without jobs.  And long-time Seattle manufacturer Cascade Designs will move 100 of its lowest-skilled manufacturing jobs from Seattle to Nevada. Read the rest of this entry »


Sweet Dreams, Interrupted: Alaska Airlines Flight Returns To Seattle After Napping Worker Gets Trapped In Plane’s Cargo Hold

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SEATTLE (AP) — A Los Angeles-bound Alaska Airlines flight had to return to Seattle on Monday after a worker reportedly fell asleep and found himself trapped in the plane’s cargosleepy hold.

“Upon exiting, he told authorities he had fallen asleep.”

Flight 448 had just taken off Monday afternoon when the pilot heard banging from down below, the airline said in a news release. The captain immediately returned to Seattle-Tacoma International and declared an emergency for priority landing.

“Nobody knew why we were turning around. They just said we were fine and we weren’t in any danger.”

After the plane landed a ramp agent came out from the front cargo hold, which Alaska says is pressurized and temperature-controlled.

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“They just said there was someone in the cargo hold and he’s been escorted off and taken away,”

— Passenger Marty Collins

“Upon exiting, he told authorities he had fallen asleep,” the airline said.

The worker, an employee of Menzies Aviation, walked off the plane and appeared OK, but was taken to a hospital as a precaution. Read the rest of this entry »


Seattle Airport Jetway Drops as Passengers from Phoenix Exit Flight

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A large crane stands ready to lift a jetway, right, that had a mechanical failure and slowly lowered to the ground Tuesday, May 13, 2014, while connected to a Southwest Airlines airplane at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport. The incident happened as passengers from Phoenix were deplaning. The next leg of the flight to Chicago had to be canceled so the jetway could be removed from the airplane and a damage inspection could be completed. — AP Photo

SEATAC, Wash. — A jet bridge dropped several feet Tuesday as passengers were exiting a Southwest Airlines flight at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport, but no one was injured, officials said.

The end of the walkway, where it was attached to the plane, fell 6 to 8 feet. Some passengers were on the bridge at the time, but it was unclear how many, said airport spokesman Perry Cooper.

The cause of the drop was described as a mechanical failure. Thanks to a backup system — a large screw under the jetway that turns as it is raised or lowered — the bridge fell slowly, and those who were on it walked up to the gate, Cooper said.

About half of the passengers — 60 people — had exited the aircraft when the walkway fell. The rest left by a stairway brought to the other side of the plane. Read the rest of this entry »