HELTER SKELTER: Leslie Van Houten, Charles Manson Follower, Granted Parole 

Leslie Van Houten, 19, a member of Charles Manson's "family" who is charged with the murders of Leno and Rosemary LaBianca, is escorted by two deputy sheriffs as she leaves the courtroom in Los Angeles, Dec. 19, 1969 after a brief hearing at which time she was appointed a new attorney. The court appointed Marvin Part to represented Ms. Van Houten after her previous attorney said she and her family could not pay his fees. (AP Photo/George Brich)

Van Houten was convicted of two of the Tate-LaBianca murders, that of grocer Leno LaBianca and his wife Rosemary.

For the first time, the California state parole board has voted to free one of the principal accomplices of Charles Manson in the 1969 Tate-LaBianca murders.

Leslie Van Houten was granted parole in her 21st request before the board at the California Institution for Women, which sent the recommendation on to the governor.

29 Mar 1971, Los Angeles, California, USA --- Susan Denise Atkins, (left), Patricia Krenwinkel and Leslie Van Houten,(right), laugh after receiving the death sentence for their part in the Tate-LaBianca killing at the order of Charles Manson. --- Image by © Bettmann/CORBIS

29 Mar 1971, Los Angeles, California, USA — Susan Denise Atkins, (left), Patricia Krenwinkel and Leslie Van Houten,(right), laugh after receiving the death sentence for their part in the Tate-LaBianca killing at the order of Charles Manson. — Image by © Bettmann/CORBIS

However, Van Houten is not free yet — Gov. Jerry Brown in 2014 vetoed the parole board recommendation that Manson “Family” member Bruce Davis be paroled for his role in another murder that was not part of the sensational 1971 trial that gripped America.

Leslie Van Houten listens during her parole hearing in Corona, California, June 28, 2002. A California state parole board said Van Houten, 52, who has spent 30 years in prison for one of the most shocking killing sprees in U.S. history, should not be paroled because of the "calculated pre-planned manner" of her crime. - RTXLCMK

Leslie Van Houten listens during her parole hearing in Corona, California, June 28, 2002. A California state parole board said Van Houten, 52, who has spent 30 years in prison for one of the most shocking killing sprees in U.S. history, should not be paroled because of the “calculated pre-planned manner” of her crime

Van Houten was convicted of two of the Tate-LaBianca murders, that of wealthy grocer Leno LaBianca and his wife Rosemary.

19 Jun 1970, Santa Monica, California, USA --- "I Don't Have Any Guilt" said long-haired hippie chieftain Charles Manson, 35, in brief press conference in courtroom here, June 18, where a hearing to continue proceedings in the murder case of musician Dary Hinman was held. Manson's trial for the slaying of actress Sharon Tate and four others last August 9th, and the killing of a wealthy supermarket chain owner and his wife the day after the Tate murder, began this week and forced postponement of the Hinman case. --- Image by © Bettmann/CORBIS

19 Jun 1970, Santa Monica, California, USA — “I Don’t Have Any Guilt” said long-haired hippie chieftain Charles Manson, 35, in brief press conference in courtroom here, June 18, where a hearing to continue proceedings in the murder case of musician Dary Hinman was held. Manson’s trial for the slaying of actress Sharon Tate and four others last August 9th, and the killing of a wealthy supermarket chain owner and his wife the day after the Tate murder, began this week and forced postponement of the Hinman case. — Image by © Bettmann/CORBIS

Van Houten acknowledged holding down Mrs. LaBianca with a pillow and an electrical cord while other “Family” members stabbed her. At her trial, where Van Houten was originally sentenced to death, she happily described stabbing Mrs. LaBianca herself post-mortem.

“I don’t let myself off the hook. I don’t find parts in any of this that makes me feel the slightest bit good about myself,” she told the parole board panel now.

MansonLVH

Van Houten was not at the previous night’s attack, at which actress Sharon Tate and her houseguests were killed in a grisly manner that Manson hoped would incite revolution against the “pigs” based on his interpretation of the Beatles song “Helter Skelter.” Read the rest of this entry »


REWIND: Charles Manson’s Murder Trial Started 45 Years Ago Today, June 15, 1970

25 Jan 1971, Los Angeles, California, USA --- Seven deputies escort Charles Manson from the courtroom after he and three followers were found guilty of seven murders in the Tate-LaBianca slayings. --- Image by © Bettmann/CORBIS

25 Jan 1971, Los Angeles, California, USA — Seven deputies escort Charles Manson from the courtroom after he and three followers were found guilty of seven murders in the Tate-LaBianca slayings. — Image by © Bettmann/CORBIS

29 Mar 1971, Los Angeles, California, USA --- Susan Denise Atkins, (left), Patricia Krenwinkel and Leslie Van Houten,(right), laugh after receiving the death sentence for their part in the Tate-LaBianca killing at the order of Charles Manson. --- Image by © Bettmann/CORBIS

29 Mar 1971, Los Angeles, California, USA — Susan Denise Atkins, (left), Patricia Krenwinkel and Leslie Van Houten,(right), laugh after receiving the death sentence for their part in the Tate-LaBianca killing at the order of Charles Manson. — Image by © Bettmann/CORBIS

19 Jun 1970, Santa Monica, California, USA --- "I Don't Have Any Guilt" said long-haired hippie chieftain Charles Manson, 35, in brief press conference in courtroom here, June 18, where a hearing to continue proceedings in the murder case of musician Dary Hinman was held.  Manson's trial for the slaying of actress Sharon Tate and four others last August 9th, and the killing of a wealthy supermarket chain owner and his wife the day after the Tate murder, began this week and forced postponement of the Hinman case. --- Image by © Bettmann/CORBIS

19 Jun 1970, Santa Monica, California, USA — “I Don’t Have Any Guilt” said long-haired hippie chieftain Charles Manson, 35, in brief press conference in courtroom here, June 18, where a hearing to continue proceedings in the murder case of musician Dary Hinman was held. Manson’s trial for the slaying of actress Sharon Tate and four others last August 9th, and the killing of a wealthy supermarket chain owner and his wife the day after the Tate murder, began this week and forced postponement of the Hinman case. — Image by © Bettmann/CORBIS


Manson Family Flashback

sharon-tate-manson

folie partagee


Mad Men Season 6: Creator Matthew Weiner On Don’s Bold Moves And Season 6 Conspiracy Theories

mad men season 6
Note: Do not read on if you have not yet seen the Season 6 finale of AMC’s “Mad Men,” titled “In Care Of.”

Could Don Draper finally be growing up?

Most fathers are not a mystery to their children; most adults are not quite so hobbled by tortured pasts. But most people are not Don Draper, who, in the course of “Mad Men’s” six seasons, has tried to shield his kids from the most basic truths about himself. Where he’s from, how he grew up, what kind of life he had: Those were all things that he lied about, to co-workers, clients and those closest to him. But as viewers saw in the show’s Season 6 finale (which I wrote about here), Don is in the process of shedding that false skin.

The final image of Season 6 was Draper showing his three children the house of ill repute in which he grew up. We don’t know yet if his bold gamble will pay off, or if his daughter Sally, who grew especially disenchanted with her father this season, will continue on her path of rebellion and barely-suppressed fury at her father.

Don also revealed the truth about his origins during a meeting with an important potential client, and everyone in the room was appropriately stunned. According to “Mad Men” creator and executive producer Matthew Weiner, however, Don’s behavior in the Hershey meeting is not what got him fired (or placed on leave). That meeting, shocking though it was, was “a very minor infraction in all this,” Weiner said. As he explained, the entire penultimate season of the show (and all the questionable behavior it contained) was meant to lead Don to the point where he felt he could — and had to — start to be at least partially truthful about himself to the people around him.

In the interview below, Weiner discusses the events that led Don to this moment, as well as his future (or lack thereof) at SC&P, the paths that Joan and Peggy took this season, the conspiracy theories surrounding the show and Megan Draper’s infamous “Sharon Tate” T-shirt, among other things.

This interview has been edited and slightly condensed.

Don went in to that Hershey meeting thinking they weren’t really serious about taking on an agency, so in a way, there wasn’t much at stake for him. But could you talk a little bit more about his motivations for coming clean about his past in that setting, especially given how his colleagues were likely to react?
I think that he is not thinking about his colleagues and I think that he is in a crisis. As you can tell, he’s planning on going to California; he has quit drinking. Ted has just told him that he wants to go to California, and I think a lot of what Ted said is resonating in his mind. But our whole goal for the season was to put Don in a position where he knew whether he was going to change or not. At least looking in the mirror and admitting who he was, in some ways, was going to make him feel better, and alleviate that anxiety that he has been feeling all year — [the anxiety] that led to him destroying his relationship with his daughter, that led to him destroying his business and his role in his business.

It’s not that the Hershey meeting has no stakes. It’s that the Hershey meeting actually has a very personal connection to him. You see him get up there and just lie his head off. And we know that everything he is saying isn’t true. We were sort of building to one line the whole season, where the client says, “Weren’t you a lucky little boy?” [In that moment, Don was] looking over at Ted and realizing that he was a liar and that he had to confess. That’s what I think that was: a confession.

Read the rest of this entry »