[SLIDESHOW] 12 celebrities Who Have Killed People

Here are 12 celebrities who have been convicted of killing other people, whether they meant to or not.

car-killer

One year after his breakout hit “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off,” Matthew Broderick was driving with then-girlfriend Jennifer Gray (who played his sister in the movie) while on vacation in Northern Ireland when his rental car swerved into the wrong lane and killed a 28-year-old woman and her mother. He was charged with careless driving and fined $175. (Photo by Jemal Countess/Getty Images)

993 - Robert De Niro directs Lillo Brancato in "A Bronx Tale." - Photo By Phillip Caruso/Savoy Pictures

 Robert De Niro directs Lillo Brancato in “A Bronx Tale.” – Photo By Phillip Caruso/Savoy Pictures

Bronx Tale” and “The Sopranos” actor, Lillo Brancato, is currently serving a 10-year sentence for being involved in a burglary and homicide of an off-duty police officer in 2005.

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“Mork and Mindy” and “Designing Women” actress Fay Dewitt was convicted of stabbing and killing her husband with a letter opener in 1965…(see the whole 12-pack of killer celebs)

The Daily Caller


BOOKS: A Look at TV’s Third Golden Age

Posted by juliewbp, Reviewed by Andrew

Difficult Men: Behind the Scenes of a Creative Revolution: From The Sopranos and The Wire to Mad Men and Breaking Bad by Brett Martin

Difficult Men by Brett Martin is a great exploration of TV’s Third Golden Age, as it’s come to be known. On the cover is Tony Soprano and Walter White so the reader would be easily tricked into thinking that the book is about the anti-hero that dominates current TV. It is actually about the men who created these characters.

David Chase, creator of the Sopranos, is portrayed as a very serious and depressed failed filmmaker. He never gave TV any pedestal and always saw himself as an auteur like his French film making idols. He worked on numerous TV shows before he got his shot to truly change television when HBO green lighted the Sopranos. Since then, nothing has been the same. Read the rest of this entry »


A Tale of Two Seasons…

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Yesterday the New York Times broke the news that the final season of Mad Men will be broadcast in two parts (see more on this here). This isn’t the first time that a television series has been split into two – AMC recently adopted the same strategy for Breaking Bad which saw a gap of almost a year between the first half and the last half of the final fifth season. Nor is this necessarily even a recent trend – HBO notably broadcast the final season of The Sopranos (1999-2007) in a similar manner. In that instance, the decision to split the season into two was arguably more of an afterthought, as the series’ creator David Chase later decided that he wanted the opportunity to “round out the story”. But it’s not just TV (as the HBO slogan goes), this happens in cinema too. Franchises such as Harry Potter (2001-2011) and Twilight (2008-2012) have both recently featured two-part endings in concluding their narratives. The logic behind the two-part conclusion, whether it’s in film or television, is no doubt financially motivated. Indeed, why not draw out the story in two parts and reap the financial rewards? In the case of cinema, this form of serialisation is intended to increase box office takings (presumably people who saw part one will want to see part two), while in television the money comes from subscription fees and advertising. This economic gain may be the main impetus for this trend, but I’m more interested in the way that these patterns of distribution might impact upon the programme’s narrative. Read the rest of this entry »


BREAKING MAD: Screenwriter Robert Towne Joins Writing Staff of ‘Mad Men’

MadManTowne

A sign of confidence? Or uncertainty? Mad Men hits the final stretch.

Cynthia Littleton writes:

“Veteran screenwriter Robert Towne (pictured) is among Matthew Weiner’s new recruits to “Mad Men’s” writing staff for the upcoming seventh and final season, which AMC announced Monday will unfold in two seven-episode batches in spring 2014 and spring 2015.”

I question the decision to break up the final season into a two-year boutique-sized spread. Is this a creative decision? Or is AMC milking the popularity of the series for additional commercial or prestige reasons Or is the Mad Men staff pressed to conclude the series to Matthew Weiner’s satisfaction, and AMC is giving him more time? Let’s hear what you guys think. — The Butcher

“Towne is serving as a consulting producer…. He won an original screenplay Oscar for 1974′s “Chinatown” (a source of many oft-quoted lines including: “Forget it, Jake. It’s Chinatown”). He earned three other Oscar screenwriting noms, for 1973′s “The Last Detail,” 1975′s “Shampoo” … Recent credits include “Mission: Impossible II…”

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‘Mad Men’s’ Matthew Weiner Talks His First Feature Film

Matthew Weiner

There’s a growing consensus among filmmakers that television, not film, offers the more hospitable climate for innovative work. While this might be true, here’s the anomaly: The very innovators who brought about this change still go back to movies to create their “personal” projects.

David Chase, who turned TV around with “The Sopranos,” shot his own personal story in his 2012 movie “Not Fade Away,” which pulled a fast fade earning less than $650,000 domestically. And now Matthew Weiner, who is prepping his seventh and final season of “Mad Men,” is unveiling his first significant feature directing effort, “You Are Here,” at the Toronto fest next week. His new film is a far cry from his first feature, a low-budget black-and-white pic in which he also starred, which was never released.

And while Weiner commands an imperial presence in TV land, he arrives at Toronto as a humble near-first time director, aspiring for some good reviews and, more importantly, for a distributor.

Read the rest of this entry »