Seattle Airport Jetway Drops as Passengers from Phoenix Exit Flight

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A large crane stands ready to lift a jetway, right, that had a mechanical failure and slowly lowered to the ground Tuesday, May 13, 2014, while connected to a Southwest Airlines airplane at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport. The incident happened as passengers from Phoenix were deplaning. The next leg of the flight to Chicago had to be canceled so the jetway could be removed from the airplane and a damage inspection could be completed. — AP Photo

SEATAC, Wash. — A jet bridge dropped several feet Tuesday as passengers were exiting a Southwest Airlines flight at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport, but no one was injured, officials said.

The end of the walkway, where it was attached to the plane, fell 6 to 8 feet. Some passengers were on the bridge at the time, but it was unclear how many, said airport spokesman Perry Cooper.

The cause of the drop was described as a mechanical failure. Thanks to a backup system — a large screw under the jetway that turns as it is raised or lowered — the bridge fell slowly, and those who were on it walked up to the gate, Cooper said.

About half of the passengers — 60 people — had exited the aircraft when the walkway fell. The rest left by a stairway brought to the other side of the plane. Read the rest of this entry »


What to Do When ObamaCare Unravels

Health insurance should be individual, portable across jobs, states and providers, and lifelong and renewable.

David Gothard

David Gothard

John H. Cochrane  writes:  The unraveling of the Affordable Care Act presents a historic opportunity for change. Its proponents call it “settled law,” but as Prohibition taught us, not even a constitutional amendment is settled law—if it is dysfunctional enough, and if Americans can see a clear alternative.

This fall’s website fiasco and policy cancellations are only the beginning. Next spring the individual mandate is likely to unravel when we see how sick the people are who signed up on exchanges, and if our government really is going to penalize voters for not buying health insurance. The employer mandate and “accountable care organizations” will take their turns in the news. There will be scandals. There will be fraud. This will go on for years.

Yet opponents should not sit back and revel in dysfunction. The Affordable Care Act was enacted in response to genuine problems. Without a clear alternative, we will simply patch more, subsidize more, and ignore frauds and scandals, as we do in Medicare and other programs.

There is an alternative. A much freer market in health care and health insurance can work, can deliver high quality, technically innovative care at much lower cost, and solve the pathologies of the pre-existing system.

Read the rest of this entry »