[VIDEO] Late Show: Celebrity Rot-Fest Concludes with Lame ‘Top Ten Things I’ve Always Wanted to Say To David Letterman’

An all-star group including Bill Murray, Tina Fey, Peyton Manning, Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Chris Rock, Jim Carrey, Jerry Seinfeld, Steve Martin, Barbara Walters and Alec Baldwin salute David Letterman in his last Top Ten List.


[VIDEO] The New Phonebook’s Here!

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[VIDEO] Newspaper Scene from ‘Roxanne’

This throwaway scene from Steve Martin’s 1987 romantic comedy classic “Roxanne” is one of the best examples of his comedic genius.

 


Free-Speech Wars: You Are What You Say, Not What You Do

youth-hipsters

David French writes: I appreciate Michael’s post about the latest Huffpo-reported controversies involving Steve Martin, Joan Rivers, Jennifer Lawrence, and many, many others. Peruse the pages of lefty news outlets like the Huffington Post and you’ll routinely run across headlines like, ”[Insert Celebrity Name] said WHAT?!?” or “[Insert previously unknown individual] fired for insensitive remarks.” Even the conservative press can sometimes feel like an engine of perpetual outrage over hateful or insensitive comments.

These “two minutes hates” are deeply corrosive to our free-speech culture, but they’re also the inevitable outgrowth of succeeding generations that increasingly define virtue not through actions but through attitudes. In other words, watch what I say. What I do is irrelevant. You’re a bad person if you say the wrong things, no matter what you might do for your family or your fellow man. A lifetime of good works can be rendered irrelevant by a single thoughtless tweet.

But what else can we expect when we live lives of increasing narcissism and when youth (the audience most fired up by social media) retreat from engagement with the real world? For years now, we’ve heard that Millennials were special – “Generation We” — the generation that was most concerned with social justice and helping others. Others said no, describing experience with a generation that was constantly managing its own image on social media, immersed in tweets and “likes” and selfies — all while expecting great returns for little work. But what do the data say? Is it Generation We or Generation Me?  Here’s Jean Twenge writing in The Atlantic:

In my 2006 book Generation Me, I presented data showing generational increases in self-esteem, assertiveness, self-importance, narcissism, and high expectations, based on surveys of 1.2 million young people, some dating back to the 1920s. These analyses indicated a clear cultural shift toward individualism and focusing on the self. But perhaps both views were correct — maybe Millennials’ greater self-importance found expression in helping others and caring about larger social causes.

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