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St. Clement’s Catholic Primary School Worker in Trouble Over Her ‘Designer Vagina’ 

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Study: Surgeons Perform Better When They Listen To Music They Dig

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Surgeons have better technique and efficiency when closing incisions when they listen to music they prefer

GALVESTON, Texas (CBS Houston) — A new study finds that surgeons perform better when they listen to their preferred music.

“Our study confirmed that listening to the surgeon’s preferred music improves efficiency and quality of wound closure, which may translate to health care cost savings and better patient outcomes.”

— Study co-author Dr. Andrew Zhang

Science Daily reports a University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston finds that plastic surgeons have better technique and efficiency when closing incisions when they listen to music they prefer.

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“We recognized that our subject could potentially improve on the second repair simply as the result of repetition. This effect was reduced by randomly assigning the residents to music first or no music first groups.”

— Study co-author Dr. Shelby Lies, chief plastic surgery resident

“Our study confirmed that listening to the surgeon’s preferred music improves efficiency and quality of wound closure, which may translate to health care cost savings and better patient outcomes,” study co-author Dr. Andrew Zhang, an assistant professor of surgery in the division of plastic and reconstructive surgery, told Science Daily.

The study focused on 15 plastic surgery residents who were asked to close incisions with layered stiches on pigs’ feet.

Science Daily reports that the residents were told to inform them when they were done with the first closure. The next day, the residents were asked to do another identical closure with the music either being on or off, in opposition to the day before. Read the rest of this entry »


Pundit Planet Math: Industrial Accident + Chinese Surgeons = Photo of the Day

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Zhou had his left hand chopped off during a work accident involving a spinning blade machine and was rushed to hospital

CAROLINE MORTIMER reports: Chinese surgeons have saved a hand severed in an industrial accident by grafting it on to the man’s ankle for a month before reattaching it to his arm. The surgery was carried on a factory worker known as Zhou at Xiangya Hospital in Changsha, the capital of Hunan province in central China.

Zhou had his left hand chopped off during a work accident involving a spinning blade machine and was rushed to hospital where Dr Tang Juyu, head of microsurgery at the hospital, decide to operate to give him the chance to “revive” his lost hand.

The surgical team were unable to reattach the hand to Zhou’s arm straight away as the severed nerves and tendons needed time to heal.

So his hand was sewn onto his leg in order to keep it “alive” until the arm was ready. Read the rest of this entry »


Japanese Hospital Intern Challenge: The Teeny Tiny Sushi Surgical Dexterity Test

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Want to intern at a leading hospital in Japan? 20 students have taken a speical test, in which they are expected to prove their dexteiry by making teeny tiny sushi with a surgical knife and a pair of tweezers.

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5 Things to Know About Head Transplants

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A Chinese surgeon is working toward the futuristic medical feat of head transplants—joining the body of one animal to the head of another—as explained in a Wall Street Journal article. Any such operation in humans, which the surgeon says could potentially help patients with broken or diseased bodies, remains far off. Here is what you need to know…(read more)

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[VIDEO] Man plays Beatles Song on Guitar WHILE UNDERGOING BRAIN SUGERY

Headline of the day: ‘Watch man playing the Beatles on his guitar while undergoing brain tumour surgery


Henry Kissinger, 91, Undergoes Heart Surgery


Science: Mending Damaged Hearts with Surgical Glue

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From MIT Technology ReviewKatherine Bourzac  writes:  Many infants born with heart defects have to undergo repeated surgeries as they grow. Replacing the sutures and staples used in surgery today with fast-acting, biodegradable glues could help make these cardiac procedures faster and safer. Researchers at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston have developed a surgical glue with promising properties: it doesn’t dissolve in blood, and it’s rubbery enough to hold a seal inside a beating heart.

The cardiac adhesive has been tested in mice and pigs and is being developed as a commercial product by French startup Gecko Biomedical. The Paris-based company, founded by biomaterials researchers in the Boston area, has $11 million in series-A funding, and the company plans to bring the surgical adhesive to patients in Europe in one to two years. The cardiac adhesive is described in a paper published today in the journal Science Translational Medicine.

Flemish heart - TrinitySutures and staples have major drawbacks, says Jeffrey Karp, a biomaterials researcher at Brigham and Women’s and one of Gecko Biomedical’s founders. Staples, which work by piercing tissue, can cause damage, and putting in sutures is time consuming. Replacing these tools with rubbery, fast-acting adhesives could help make surgeries faster and less invasive, and potentially prevent complications.

Read the rest of this entry »


How To Grow a Replacement Nose: On Your Forehead

A new nose, grown by surgeons on Xiaolian's forehead, is pictured before being transplanted to replace the original nose.

A new nose, grown by surgeons on Xiaolian’s forehead, is pictured before being transplanted to replace the original nose.                                                                                                                                Stringer / REUTERS

Laura Stampler reports: Chinese surgeons at a hospital in Fuzhou, Fujian grew a new nose on a 22-year-old man’s forehead after an accident left his original unusable, Reuters reports. Xiaolian had sustained injuries to his original nose after a traffic accident, which led to a severe infection and deformity. To craft the new appendage, doctors took cartilage from Xiaolian’s ribs and implanted it under skin tissue on his forehead. When finished growing later this month, the nose will be transplanted to its proper place. In January, British doctors grew a nose on a man’s arm after he lost his original to cancer.

[Yahoo!] – TIME.com


Too “Asian” to be on TV?

CNN’s Brooke Baldwin explores the role of diversity in today’s very visual world.

CNN.com Blogs