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Future of News: Bracing for Next Wave of Technology

New technologies have disrupted news media over the past 20 years — but one report says that’s just the beginning.

Washington (AFP) – If you think technology has shaken up the news media — just wait, you haven’t seen anything yet.

The next wave of disruption is likely to be even more profound, according to a study presented Saturday to the Online News Association annual meeting in Washington.

News organizations which have struggled in the past two decades as readers moved online and to mobile devices will soon need to adapt to artificial intelligence, augmented reality and automated journalism and find ways to connect beyond the smartphone, the report said.

“Voice interface” will be one of the big challenges for media organizations, said the report by Amy Webb, a New York University Stern School of Business faculty member and Founder of the Future Today Institute.

The institute estimates that 50 percent of interactions that consumers have with computers will be using their voices by 2023.

“Once we are speaking to our machines about the news, what does the business model for journalism look like?” the report said.

“News organizations are ceding this future ecosystem to outside corporations. They will lose the ability to provide anything but content.”

Webb writes that most news organizations have done little experimentation with chat apps and voice skills on Amazon’s Alexa and Google Home, the likes of which may be key parts of the future news ecosystem.

Because of this, she argues that artificial intelligence or AI is posing “an existential threat to the future of journalism.”

“Journalism itself is not actively participating in building the AI ecosystem,” she wrote.

One big problem facing media organizations is that new technologies impacting the future of news such as AI are out of their control, and instead is in the hands of tech firms like Google, Amazon, Tencent, Baidu, IBM, Facebook, Apple and Microsoft, according to Webb.

“News organizations are customers, not significant contributors,” the report said. Read the rest of this entry »

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[TOYS] ROCKET RADIO MG-306: Pocket Transistor Radios Manufactured During the 1950’s & 1960’s

Great website focusing on the design and history of pocket transistor radios manufactured between 1954 and 1965.

Source: ROCKET RADIO MG-306

 


The Defense Department still uses 8-inch floppy disks and computers from the 1970s to coordinate nuclear forces

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writes: Dale Hayden, a senior researcher at the Air Force’s Air University, told an audience of aerospace experts earlier this month that proliferation of antisatellite technology has put America’s communications networks at risk. “In a conflict, it will be impossible to defend all of the space assets in totality,” he said. “Losses must be expected.”

It has never been easier for America’s adversaries—principally Russia and China, but also independent nonstate actors—to degrade the U.S. military’s ability to fight and communicate. Senior military officials have expressed grave doubts about the security of the Pentagon’s information systems and America’s ability to protect the wider commercial virtual infrastructure.

The U.S. Navy, under its mission to keep the global commons free, prevents tampering with undersea cables. But accidents—and worse—do happen. Last year a ship’s anchor severed a cable in the English Channel, slowing internet service on the island of Jersey. In 2013 the Egyptian coast guard arrested three scuba divers trying to cut a cable carrying a third of the internet traffic between Europe and Egypt. “When communications networks go down, the financial services sector does not grind to a halt, rather it snaps to a halt,” warned a senior staffer to Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke in 2009. Trillions of dollars in daily trading depends on GPS, which is kept free by the Air Force.

There are now an estimated 17.6 billion devices around the world connected to the internet, including more than six billion smartphones. The tech industry expects those numbers to double by 2020. That growth is dependent, however, on secure and reliable access to intercontinental undersea fiber-optic cables, which carry 99% of global internet traffic, and a range of satellite services.

The U.S. military is working on ways of making them more resilient. For instance, the Tactical Undersea Network Architectures program promises rapidly deployable, lightweight fiber-optic backup cables, and autonomous undersea vehicles could soon be used to monitor and repair cables. In space, the military is leading the way with advanced repair satellites as well as new and experimental GPS satellites, which will enhance both military and civilian signals. Read the rest of this entry »


[VIDEO] Advanced Robotic Bat Can Fly Like the Real Thing 

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Trump’s Top Tech Titans

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Science & Fiction: 10 Technologies That Are Changing the Game


[VIDEO] Exit Politics 

We have a voice, yet Americans are led to believe we must support this façade of lies and force we know as politics.
The political process doesn’t move our world forward. We advance through technology and the pursuit of our vision for a better life. Let us embrace our voice, let us exit.


[VIDEO] Toshiba’s Communication Robot Chihira Aico’s Debut as a Receptionist Impresses Department Store Customers

“Humanoid robot capable of expressing various feeling.”

According to RocketNews24, Toshiba has plans to expand its robotics business outside of customer service and into healthcare, especially as companions for Japan’s aging population. Read the rest of this entry »


Vintage Futuristic Concept Car

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[VIDEO] Humanoid Robot Has a Sense of Self

The human self has five components. Machines now have three of them. How far away is artificial consciousness – and what does it tell us about ourselves?

Full story here


In Japan, Man’s Best Friend is Actually a Robot


ご挨拶、人間!Customers at Some Banks in Tokyo Will Soon be Greeted by a Robot

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[PHOTO] Someday Everyone Will Have a Computer In Their Home

retro-computer-kitchen-dream


City of the Future

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The Innovation 15: Our Most Science and Tech-Friendly Members of Congress

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The Innovation 15: Our Most Science- and Tech-Friendly Members of Congress
So maybe things aren’t that great. The 113th Congress of the United States is on track to enact just 251 laws in its two-year session, the least productive Congress since 1973. If a bill attempts to do anything more than rename a post office, it’s likely to languish in committee, ignored, while lawmakers sling partisan dung over budgets and borders. Not a great environment for innovation-minded legislation trying to become law. But it’s midterm- election time in America, and 33 Senate seats and every seat in the House of Representatives are up for grabs. Read the rest of this entry »


A Map of Every Device in the World that’s Connected to the Internet


REWIND: Police Cameras of the 1950s

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Doryu 2-16 Pistol Camera ~ This realistic automatic pistol-shaped 16mm camera was developed for police and surveillance tasks in 1954, and was produced until 1956. – atomic-flash – mudwerksmudwerks

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Martha Stewart: Why I Love My Drone

Featured Image -- 43910

TIME

There’s been a lot of discussion and a tremendous amount of speculation lately about the nature of drones and their role in our society as useful tools and hobbyist toys.

Last year, while celebrating my birthday in Maine, I was given a drone fitted with a high-definition camera. After a quick introduction to the mechanics of operating the contraption and a few words about its idiosyncrasies, I loaded the appropriate app on my iPad and went down to the beach.

In just a few minutes I was hooked. In near silence, the drone rose, hovered, and dove, silently and surreptitiously photographing us and the landscape around us. The photos and video were stunning. By assuming unusual vantage points, the drone allowed me to “see” so much more of my surroundings than usual. The view I was “seeing” on my iPad with the help of the drone would have otherwise been…

View original post 743 more words


Apple agrees to $400 million settlement in ebook price-fixing case


[PHOTO] Floating Water Droplets

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A photo through two floating water droplets

Exploring Space


[VIDEO] Yo-Yo Tricks In Space!

Fun with Physics! NASA astronaut Don Pettit enjoyed some of his off-duty time showcasing yo-yo behavior in microgravity aboard the International Space Station.

 


First Test Flight of NASA’s Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator a Success


Ready for the heat: Engineers install Heat Shield on the NASA Orion Spacecraft


NASA and Marvel Super Heroes Have something in Common? Yes…


Japan Exploring Manned Missions to Mars

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火星の日本人!

The Yomiuri Shimbun:  The science and technology ministry will pursue manned Japanese exploration of Mars through international cooperation as part of the nation’s space program, ministry sources said.

It is the first time the government has incorporated Martian exploration into the country’s space program, according tomars-earth the Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology Ministry.

The plan was submitted to a panel of experts run by the ministry to discuss space program-related issues, including international space exploration following the end of the International Space Station operation. It will be finalized as early as next month and reported to the government’s Committee on the National Space Policy.

According to the ministry draft, the government will gradually advance the plan, which includes unmanned exploration and long-term settlement on the moon. Read the rest of this entry »


Earth’s Atmosphere, an Extremely Thin Sheet of Air from Surface Edge of Space


Elon Musk Gives a Tour of SpaceX’s New Dragon V2, its New Human Spacecraft


[Photo] The NASA Clean Assembly Room

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The NASA clean assembly room on Merritt Island, FL has never been opened to the public. Yesterday it was opened to friends and family of employees. Here’s a panorama.

spaceexp –Exploring Space : Photo


Interactive Panorama Lets You Stand on Mars

Caked in red silt, NASA’s Curiosity rover looks like it’s been trekking through a Martian dust storm in this latest interactive panorama. But nothing can tarnish the joy of seeing this incredible machine hard at work on another planet.

The dust-covered robot is currently preparing for its third drilling operation on Mars, at a site nicknamed the Kimberley. In recent days, engineers have inspected and scrubbed the dust from a spot on a rock they named “Windjana,” after a gorge in Western Australia. (Too bad the rover can’t turn its wire bristle dust removal tool on itself.) Curiosity has already done preparatory drill work and will soon sample some of Windjana’s interior. The rover will run this sample through a series of tests to give scientists a better understanding of the history of water in this area...(read more)

Wired


[PHOTO] Image of the Day: Speechless

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Google+www.readwrite.com/


[PHOTO] Saturn V Propellers

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Kennedy Space Center, Saturn V propellers

Source: benjetpascal01

Exploring Space


How Technology Is Destroying Jobs

tech-job-killDavid Rotman writes:  Given his calm and reasoned academic demeanor, it is easy to miss just how provocative Erik Brynjolfsson’s contention really is. ­Brynjolfsson, a professor at the MIT Sloan School of Management, and his collaborator and coauthor Andrew McAfee have been arguing for the last year and a half that impressive advances in computer technology—from improved industrial robotics to automated translation services—are largely behind the sluggish employment growth of the last 10 to 15 years. Even more ominous for workers, the MIT academics foresee dismal prospects for many types of jobs as these powerful new technologies are increasingly adopted not only in manufacturing, clerical, and retail work but in professions such as law, financial services, education, and medicine.

Economic theory and government policy will have to be rethought if technology is indeed destroying jobs faster than it is creating new ones.

That robots, automation, and software can replace people might seem obvious to anyone who’s worked in automotive manufacturing or as a travel agent. But Brynjolfsson and McAfee’s claim is more troubling and controversial. They believe that rapid technological change has been destroying jobs faster than it is creating them, contributing to the stagnation of median income and the growth of inequality in the United States. And, they suspect, something similar is happening in other technologically advanced countries.

Read the rest of this entry »


Intellectual Property Fosters Corporate Concentration

Patents and copyrights are government monopoly grants with nothing in common with the notion of property at the heart of libertarianism.

  writes:  The modern libertarian case against so-called intellectual property (IP) has been building steadily since the late 1980s, when I first encountered it. Since then, an impressive volume of work has been produced from many perspectives: economics, political economy, sociology, moral and political philosophy, history, and no doubt more. It is indeed a case to be reckoned with. (Roderick Long has put together a web page with links to some of the best anti-IP material written over the last quarter century. My own contributions include “Patent Nonsense,” “Intellectual ‘Property’ Versus Real Property” and “Slave Labor and Intellectual Property.” A brief spontaneous debate that I participated in is here.)

I won’t try to recap the whole case here, but I do want to answer a question that will occur to many advocates of liberty: How can someone who supports property rights in physical objects deny property rights in intellectual products, such as the useful application of scientific principles or patterns of words, musical tones, or colors? Suffice it here to quote from “Patent Nonsense”:

There is a distinction between physical objects and ideas that is crucial to the property question. Two or more people cannot use the same pair of socks at the same time and in the same respect, but they can use the same idea — or if not the same idea, ideas with the same content. That tangible objects are scarce and finite accounts for the emergence of property rights in civilization. Considering the nature of human beings and the physical world they inhabit, if individuals are to flourish in society they need rules regarding thine and mine. But “ideal objects” are not bound by the same restrictions. Ideas can be multiplied infinitely and almost costlessly; they can be used nonrivalrously.

If I articulate an idea in front of other people, each now has his own “copy.” Yet I retain mine. However the others use their copies, it is hard to see how they have committed an injustice.

broken-bulbPractices respectful of private property in physical objects and land emerged spontaneously over millennia, embedded in customs that served to avert conflict in order to create space within which social beings could flourish. (See John Hasnas’s “Toward a Theory of Empirical Natural Rights” [PDF].)

In contrast, “rights” in ideas — patents and copyrights — were government monopoly grants having nothing in common with the notion of property at the heart of libertarianism. In fact, such artificial rights undermine genuine property by authorizing IP holders to enlist government power to stop other people from using their justly acquired resources and ideas. For example, if Jones (having committed no trespass) observes Smith’s invention or artistic creation, Jones could be legally stopped from using his own physical property in conjunction with ideas obtained through that observation. That sure looks as though IP bestows on Smith purported rights over Jones’s tangible property and even Jones himself. One might ask, Isn’t the idea Smith’s? But I can’t see how an idea in Jones’s mind can possibly be Smith’s, even if Smith had it first  — unless Smith owns Jones, an unlibertarian notion indeed.

Read the rest of this entry »


Analysis: Bad Managers Ruined Obamacare

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Politicians can’t talk their way out of a technological mess

Glenn Harlan Reynolds  writes: The Obamacare rollout remains a debacle, but now enough time has passed that smart people are beginning to dissect what went wrong. So far, the best take I’ve seen comes from Internet pioneer Clay Shirky, who notes that the politicians weren’t listening to the people doing the actual work.

I was talking about this to my Administrative Law class not long ago. I had told them that there are few real secrets in D.C. because everyone sleeps with everyone else. A student then asked why both the administration and the GOP seemed to have been blindsided by the Obamacare website problems. “I guess nobody was sleeping with the techies,” was my response.

Shirky leaves out sex as an explanation — always a mistake where Washington is concerned — but he does focus on communication, and on the problems with having big tech programs run by people who don’t actually understand the technology.

Read the rest of this entry »


icePhone: Because everyone wants to look like they’re talking on a popsicle

icePhone: Because everyone wants to look like they're talking on a popsicleWhen you’re a little kid, any slightly long object turns into your own personal phone. The remote control, a banana, maybe even a sausage have all served as substitute talking devices for children not quite old enough to have their own fully-functional mobile device.

When you’re a little kid, any slightly long object turns into your own personal phone. The remote control, a banana, maybe even a sausage have all served as substitute talking devices for children not quite old enough to have their own fully-functional mobile device.


Technology Is Killing ObamaCare, But It Might Save The Rest of Us

(Photo: Leslie Smith Jr., USA TODAY)

(Photo: Leslie Smith Jr., USA TODAY)

Glenn Reynolds writes:  Despite all the problems with Obamacare, there’s some good news on the horizon for medical care and costs. The good news has nothing to do with exchanges, reimbursement rates or “navigators,” but everything to do with a phenomenon that has cut costs elsewhere in American society: technology.

We’re already seeing things that once took place only in doctors’ offices trickling out into the real world. I thought about this just the other day when reading that schools are stocking auto-injectors of epinephrine to deal with sudden, life-threatening allergy attacks. With these injectors, you don’t have to have any particular medical skill: “The tip of the device is placed firmly against the thigh, which releases a short, spring activated needle that injects the epinephrine.”

With a severe allergic reaction, by the time you got the victim to the hospital it would probably be too late. But with an auto-injector on the hand, you can administer life-saving treatment right away, and the technology makes it easy to store and easy to use. Read the rest of this entry »


The Social (Drone) Network

 writes:  The word drone didn’t always have the negative connotation it has been saddled with through frequent news coverage of U.S. military bombing using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). There are many benign uses of drone technology, and these are pretty far removed from what you see on the news. Many hobbyists and some commercial photographers are using small camera-carrying drones for fun or to make money.

One group of enthusiasts seeks to change how people view drones. According to the Drone User Group Netowork (DUGN) website, the organization “seeks to foster interest in the use of civilian unmanned aerial technology and demonstrate its positive potential for humanity.” Read the rest of this entry »


China: Bridge Collapse Caught on Camera

Dozens of visitors fell into the water in China after a foot bridge collapsed on Sunday.Surveillance video shows the moment a large group of people crossing a pedestrian bridge  in China’s Jiangxi province is sent tumbling into the water, triggering a frantic rescue effort.

As people cross, the bridge folds beneath them, dumping dozens of people into the two-meter-deep water. Local authorities said that more than ten people were injured. The cause of the collapse is still under investigation.

TIME.com


7 Builds We Love From World Maker Faire New York 2013

Gotham Laboratories’ MapperBot

The team at Go Lab came up with the idea for an asteroid mapper as an entry in the NASA Space Apps Challenge. The MapperBot is made up of a cubesat that houses a camera, 12 mini processors, and a micro ion thruster system. The cubesat will launch from a larger satellite and fly by an asteroid, snapping detailed 3D pictures of the asteroid’s surface with a Lytro camera. The thruster system charges and vaporizes the metal of the frame of the cubesat, shooting off ions and allowing for surprising maneuverability without the need to carry a bulkier thruster system (the cubesats are meant to be cheap and disposable). The info gathered from these asteroid flybys will be sent back to NASA, where it’ll be turned into a 3D map. From there, scientists will determine whether that particular asteroid is suitable for capture. The Go Labbers at Maker Faire attached their camera to a drone for audience demos.

Read more:  Popular Mechanics


How to Talk on the Telephone

How to Talk on the Telephone