Zerlina Maxwell: ‘No Matter What the Facts Are, We Can’t Let It Interfere With Our Agenda’

Not long after I posted this, NRO‘s Tim Cavanaugh posted this excellent analysis. In fact, the post-disaster analysis that’s been accumulating is even better than the initial disaster, its richness and flavor improving as it marinates, some of it is even injection-basted. I’m starting a list of links. Watch this space for updates.

 


Tim Cavanaugh on Seattle’s Folly: Indigenous People’s Day Is Offensive to Indigenous People

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Tim Cavanaugh writes: It was either Francis Parkman or Frederick Jackson Turner or the composer of the theme from F Troop who first laid down an essential truth about the American experience: In the end, Paleface and Redskin both turn chicken.

“Could it be that the Emerald City just doesn’t have candidates worth a day of celebration? The U.S. Census Bureau estimates the current population of the overwhelmingly white city at 652,405, with American Indians and Alaska Natives making up just 0.8 percent of the total.”

Now the same white male power structure that made Black History Month the shortest month in the calendar and sabotaged the Susan B. Anthony dollar by making it indistinguishable from a quarter is at it again. And the oppression is coming from the supposedly sympathetic, progressive side: The city of Seattle, Washington, has designated an “Indigenous Peoples’ Day” on the second Monday of October — a day already reserved for the federal Columbus Day holiday.

“Still, that’s 5,200 people. Couldn’t Murray just give some local Indian the key to the city?”

Seattle’s City Council unanimously passed the proposal for a non-official city holiday earlier this week. Mayor Ed Murray will sign Indigenous Peoples’ Day into law Monday, and he noted to local media that the day is only an homage that has no municipal weight (no parking relief).

(Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Progressive rubber stamp Senator Patty Murray. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

The legislation “will honor local Native-American tribes,” the Seattle Times reports. Murray claims Indigenous Peoples’ Day will “add new significance to the date without replacing the Columbus Day tradition,” according to the paper. Read the rest of this entry »


Did Obama Intentionally Decline to Honor Lauren Bacall? Pop-Culture President Fails to Issue Statement on Death of Hollywood Legend

 

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At The CornerTim Cavanaugh observes: President Barack Obama, whose opinions on entertainment are eagerly awaited by all Americans, has shocked the entertainment industry by ignoring the death of legendary Hollywood actress, and lifelong Democrat, Lauren Bacall.

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[Also see – VIDEO-  Classic Bogart & Bacall: ‘You know how to whistle, don’t you, Steve? You just put your lips together and blow’]

[Also – Actress Lauren Bacall was Among the Last of the Golden Age Screen Goddesses]

[More – [PHOTO] Lauren Bacall

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Bacall, a movie legend whose career included work with filmmakers ranging from Howard Hawks to Douglas Sirk to Lars von Trier, died Tuesday, leaving behind a legacy that included many classic films, a youthful marriage (and early widowhood) to Humphrey Bogart, and a lifetime of activism for liberal causes…(read more)

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[VIDEO] Comedy Gold: Liberal Media Panel Blames Ted Cruz, American People for Harry Reid’s Do-Nothing Leadership

At The Corner, Tim Cavanaugh writes: Why has the Senate been unable to pass anything? According to an extraordinary panel of mainstream media personalities, it’s the fault of Republicans, or of the American people.

On a Sunday discussion on NBC’s Meet the Press, host David Gregory railed against the “Do-Nothing Congress” and played a brief clip of Texas Republican Senator Ted Cruz pointing out Read the rest of this entry »


Bizarre Racial Intolerance: Whiteface Vandalism of Republican Candidate’s Sign

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For National Review OnlineTim Cavanaugh reports: A Florida Republican congressional candidate’s campaign sign was vandalized with whiteface paint last week in a district with overwhelmingly Democratic voter registration. The attack follows a string of bias incidents against black Republicans.

“We expect signs to be tampered with or stolen, but not to this extent…”

Glo Smith, who reports that she has also had a number of signs stolen, tells National Review Online she became aware of the racist defacement of an eight-foot-by-four-foot sign Tuesday. The sign was situated on private property in view of Interstate 10 in Jacksonville. The vandal sprayed white paint over the face of Smith, who is African-American. The paint job appears to be carefully done and leaves the eyes untouched, creating a very creepy effect. Read the rest of this entry »


Fossil Fool: Chris Hayes Wants to Kill About 5.7 Billion People

For NROTim Cavanaugh writes:  MSNBC host Chris Hayes is getting an alarming amount of attention for his latest effort in The Nation, a stemwinder arguing that the abolition of fossil fuels is like the abolition of slavery.

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The argument may sound forced, but Hayes has a logical premise that goes something like this: Socrates does not wear sandals; a potato kugel does not wear sandals; therefore Socrates is a potato kugel. It’s also tricked out with quasi-erudition and broad claims such as this one: “Before the widespread use of fossil fuels, slaves were one of the main sources of energy (if not the main source) for societies stretching back millennia.” (Busy old fool, unruly Sun!)

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Hayes, who serves as an editor-at-large for The Nation, manages to make 4,600 words feel even longer, with overflowing adjectives (“obvious,” “ungodly,” “brute, bloody”); lethal compound modifiers (“heart-stopping,” “full-throated”); cascades of adverbs (“immensely,” “basically,” “unfathomably” “probably,” “literally,” and even “downright”). There’s a to-be-sure paragraph guaranteeing the reader that Hayes is not making a “moral comparison between the enslavement of Africans and African Americans and the burning of carbon to power our devices” — followed by another 3,600 words comparing the enslavement of Africans and African Americans with the burning of carbon. (Hayes is coy as to what devices are in fact powered by these exotic carbon energy sources — about which more in a moment.)

So how does it make sense to compare the use of hydrocarbons with the enslavement of people? Read the rest of this entry »


Stevens: Fix Second Amendment to Remove “Any Limits” on Government Power

“…I think that’s what should be the rule, that it should be legislatures rather than judges who draw the line on what is permissible.”

For National Review OnlineTim Cavanaugh writes: Retired Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens supports gutting the Second Amendment in order to remove any limit on government infringements on the right of self-defense.

In his new book Six Amendments: How and Why We Should Change the Constitution, Stevens — who generally favored maximum government power during his 35-year tenure on the high court — proposes, among other things, changing the language of the Second Amendment to the U.S. Constitution so that the amendment would read, “ . . . the right of the people to keep and bear arms [when serving in the militia] shall not be infringed.”

[Order Justice John Paul Stevens’s book Six Amendments: How and Why We Should Change the Constitution from Amazon]

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TV: Tim Cavanaugh Reviews AMC’s “Turn”

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The birth of American espionage gets AMC’s prestige spot

Tim Cavanaugh has a review (or is it a preview?) of AMC‘s “Turn”, here’s a preview of his review. Read the full item here.

For NROTim Cavanaugh writes: Like Archie Andrews and many other American men who will follow him, Abraham Woodhull has great regard for the blonde, but he lusts for the brunette. Married to porcelain Mary, Abraham nevertheless manages to spend ample time in the presence of smoldering Anna, a childhood friend for whom he still carries a torch. Heroic circumstance, on British-occupied Long Island in the fall of 1776, will put Abraham into close contact with Anna. Anna’s husband in turn languishes in Redcoat custody, leaving her with little choice but to welcome any male support against the masher who has occupied her house, a Malfoyesque English captain.

[The source book, Washington’s Spies: The Story of America’s First Spy Ring is available at Amazon]

We know about these folks, who will form part of the Revolution’s Culper spy ring in AMC’s new Sunday show Turn, in large part thanks to the 2007 book  Washington’s Spies: The Story of America’s First Spy Ring by National Review alumnus Alexander Rose. In the show’s press materials, Rose praises Turn’s creators for exploring “these very human factors lying at the heart of that titanic clash of nations and ideologies” and for their “creation of an alien and often startling world.”

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BREAKING: FCC Withdraws Big-Brother Newsroom Intimidation ‘Monitoring’ Project

FCC chairman Tom Wheeler

FCC chairman Tom Wheeler

Intrusive media survey idea was doomed from the start

News Dump: Any surprise this withdrawal is announced on Friday, the customary day to bury unfavorable announcements? This Stalinist-progressive cuckoo-bananas Obama-era idea had no hope of lasting more than 48 hours in the spotlight before being abandoned, buried, disowned. Or is coming back? Do they really plan to ‘tweak’ it, revise it, reintroduce it quietly? Good luck with that.

In the meantime, the administration can enjoy a media transition that worked in their favor: the installation of a new asset on NBC.

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Over at Breitbart.com’s Big Government, Kerry Pickett has the headline story:

[FCC YANKS INVASIVE NEWSROOM QUESTIONNAIRE]

[See also: FCC Exploring Plans to Place ‘Government Monitors’ in Newsrooms]

National Review Online‘s Tim Cavanaugh reports:

The Federal Communications Commission has pulled the plug on its plan to conduct an intrusive probe of newsrooms as part of a “Critical Information Needs” survey of local media markets.

However, a revised version of the survey could raise new concerns: that it will trade its now-kiboshed news questions for a demographic survey that might justify new race-based media ownership rulemaking.

big-brother-half“[I]n the course of FCC review and public comment, concerns were raised that some of the questions may not have been appropriate,” the FCC announced in a statement Friday. “Chairman [Tom] Wheeler agreed that survey questions in the study directed toward media outlet managers, news directors, and reporters overstepped the bounds of what is required. Last week, Chairman Wheeler informed lawmakers that that Commission has no intention of regulating political or other speech of journalists or broadcasters and would be modifying the draft study. Yesterday, the Chairman directed that those questions be removed entirely.”

The Critical Information Needs (CIN) survey has been a slow-burning controversy since ever since this reporter first revealed its existence in October 2013.

First Amendment supporters objected that the design of the survey would have had FCC representatives interrogating newsroom staffers about how they make coverage decisions and select (or spike) story ideas. Many commentators objected to the potential intimidation involved in such a survey.

The original plan of the survey would also have taken the FCC out of its traditional purview of regulating supposedly scarce airwaves. Because the CIN sought to discover “underserved” consumers in a variety of “media ecologies,” the survey would have included not only broadcast media but newspapers, blogs and online news.

However, there have been consistent doubts that the survey was ever going to happen. In a December followup article I found that none of the major broadcast, print or online media in Columbia, South Carolina – the market selected for the Critical Information Needs pilot study – had heard from either the FCC or Silver Spring, Maryland-based Social Solutions International (SSI) the FCC’s contractor on the project.

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