[VIDEO] Fifth Planned Parenthood Video: Negotiating ‘Intact’ Fetuses

Melissa Farrell discusses contributing to the organization’s ‘diversification of the revenue stream’ and the potential to ‘get creative’ with conditions for procurement needs.

Jesse Byrnes  reports:

…In the fifth video from the Center for Medical Progress, a woman identified as Melissa Farrell, director of research for Planned Parenthood Gulf Coast, discusses contributing to the organization’s “diversification of the revenue stream” and the potential to “get creative” with conditions for procurement needs. The video was reportedly filmed this past April at a Planned Parenthood facility in Texas.

“Just depending on the patient’s anatomy, how many weeks, where it’s placed in the uterus…we’re going to potentially be able to have some that will be more or less intact, and then some that will not be.”

— — Melissa Farrell, director of research for Planned Parenthood Gulf Coast

“Just depending on the patient’s anatomy, how many weeks, where it’s placed in the uterus … we’re going to potentially be able to have some that will be more or less intact, and then some that will not be,” she said.

Farrell

“If we alter our process and we are able to obtain intact fetal cadavers, then we can make it part of the budget, that any dissections are this, and splitting the specimens into different shipments is this. I mean, it’s all just a matter of line items.”

— Melissa Farrell

“But it’s something that we can look at exploring how we can make that happen so we have a higher chance,” she adds.

melissa-planned-parenthood

“And we’ve had studies in which the company, or in the case of the investigator, has a specific need for a certain portion of the products of conception and we bake that into our contract, and our protocol, that we follow this. So we deviate from our standard in order to do that.”

— Melissa Farrell

“And we’ve had studies in which the company, or in the case of the investigator, has a specific need for a certain portion of the products of conception and we bake that into our contract, and our protocol, that we follow this. So we deviate from our standard in order to do that,” the Planned Parenthood official says in the latest video.

[Read the full text here, at TheHill]

“If we alter our process and we are able to obtain intact fetal cadavers, then we can make it part of the budget, that any dissections are this, and splitting the specimens into different shipments is this. I mean, it’s all just a matter of line items,” she adds later. Read the rest of this entry »


Planned Parenthood Plagued by Abundant Resources, Controversial Public Statements

TIME-parody-fetal-profit

(WASHINGTON) — The president of Planned Parenthood said her organization’s clinics never adjust the abortion procedure to better preserve fetal organs for medical research and that the organization’s charges cover only the cost of transmission to researchers.

Planned Parenthood has come under congressional scrutiny after the release of two stealthily recorded videos that showed officials discussing how they provide aborted fetal organs for research. Read the rest of this entry »


Next Out of the Printer, Living Tissue

Next Out of the Printer, Living Tissue - NYTimes.com

Darryl D’Lima, an orthopedic specialist, worked with a bioprinter in his research on cartilage at Scripps Clinic in San Diego.

By 

SAN DIEGO — Someday, perhaps, printers will revolutionize the world of medicine, churning out hearts, livers and other organs to ease transplantation shortages. For now, though, Darryl D’Lima would settle for a little bit of knee cartilage.

Dr. D’Lima, who heads an orthopedic research lab at the Scripps Clinic here, has already made bioartificial cartilage in cow tissue, modifying an old inkjet printer to put down layer after layer of a gel containing living cells. He has also printed cartilage in tissue removed from patients who have undergoneknee replacement surgery.

There is much work to do to perfect the process, get regulatory approvals and conduct clinical trials, but his eventual goal sounds like something from science fiction: to have a printer in the operating room that could custom-print new cartilage directly in the body to repair or replace tissue that is missing because of injury or arthritis.

Read the rest of this entry »