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Hillary’s People vs. Washington Free Beacon: About Those Tapes They Don’t Want You to Hear…

Photo by Lee Balterman/Time Life Pictures/Getty Images

Photo by Lee Balterman/Time Life Pictures/Getty Images

For Washington Free Beacon reports: The facts are these. In 1975, before she married Bill Clinton, Hillary Rodham defended a child rapist in Arkansas court. She was not a public defender. No one ordered her to take the case. An ambitious young lawyer, she was asked by a friend if she would represent the accused, and she agreed. And her defense was successful. Attacking the credibility of the 12-year-old victim on the one hand, and questioning the chain of evidence on another, Clinton got a plea-bargain for her client. He served ten months in prison, and died in 1992. The victim, now 52, has had her life irrevocably altered—for the worse.

“Hillary Clinton was not forced to take on Taylor as a client. It was her choice—and not, for her, a hard one. Certainly that complicates our understanding of the former first lady as an unrelenting defender and advocate of women and girls.”

Sometime in the mid-1980s, for an Esquire profile of rising political stars, Hillary Clinton and her husband agreed to a series of interviews with the Arkansas journalist Roy Reed. Reed and Hillary Clinton discussed at some length her defense of the child rapist, and in the course of that discussion she bragged and laughed about the case, implied she had known her client was guilty, and said her “faith in polygraphs” was forever destroyed when she saw that her client had taken one and passed. Reed’s article was never published. His tapes of the interviews were later donated to the University of Arkansas. Where they remained, gathering dust.

Read the University of Arkansas letter and the Free Beacon response here:

University of Arkansas letter to WFB by Washington Free Beacon

WFB reply to University of Arkansas by Washington Free Beacon

Contrary to what you may have heard over the past week, Clinton’s successful defense of the rapist Thomas Alfred Taylor is not “old news.” On the contrary: For a CV that has been scrutinized so closely, references to the rape case in the public record have been rather thin. Read the rest of this entry »

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University of Arkansas Student Arrested In False Sex Assault Report On Campus

garcia-julia

For 5NEWSOnline reports: An 18-year-old student was arrested Wednesday after police said she filed a false report that she was sexually assaulted on the University of Arkansas campus.

[See also: Video Uncovered Fake Sex Assault Report On UA Campus, Police Say]

Investigators used the video of the Garland Avenue parking garage from Sunday to determine Julia Garcia’s report about being sexually assaulted there was false, according to the preliminary report released by the University of Arkansas Police Department.

Julia Garcia was arrested on suspicion of filing a false police report and released from the Washington County Detention Center without bond, according to the Washington County Sheriff’s Office.

“I like that they published her name and picture. When you file a false rape report, you’re not a victim.”

Glenn Reynolds

Garcia’s arraignment is scheduled for May 30, according to the Sheriff’s Office.

The woman on Sunday reported to police that she was sexually assaulted in the Garland Avenue parking garage on campus. Officers immediately began searching for her alleged assailant, a 6-foot-tall man with a muscular build, according to the University of Arkansas Police Department.

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The Clinton Papers and the Decline of the Mainstream Media: ‘You Just Got Punk’d’

Credit: The University of Arkansas Library

Credit: The University of Arkansas Library

  writes:  The school of literary criticism known asreception theory holds that a text should be studied in light of its effect on its contemporaries, that a reader should be aware of the “horizon of expectations” in which a text is produced. I was reminded of this the other day as I observed, in amusement, fascination, and occasional pity, the reaction of the so-called mainstream media to Alana Goodman’s lengthy and rock-solid report on “The Hillary Papers.” This trove of previously unexamined transcriptions of conversations between Hillary Clinton and her best friend Diane Blair had been collecting dust at the University of Arkansas Fayetteville for years. Not anymore.

As far as Bill and Hillary Clinton are concerned, the media’s horizon of expectations is stunningly narrow. It encompasses on the one hand the belief that the “secretary of explaining stuff” is a national treasure beyond reproach, and on the other hand the expectation that the former secretary of state will be our next president. Stories that fall outside of this horizon are problematized, scrutinized, ascribed to partisanship, and read with the sort of incredulity reporters are supposed to apply to public figures such as the Clintons.

Read the rest of this entry »