Francesco Cabianca: Deposition of Christ, 1711

Deposition of Christ

CABIANCA, Francesco
Deposition of Christ
1711
Marble
Santa Maria Gloriosa dei Frari, Venice

 


Three Arrested in Venice Pier Lifeguard Attack

07-31-2015-venice-lifeguard-romy-dee

A lit cigarette might have been the spark that ignited a beach brawl involving a lifeguard that was caught on camera Thursday afternoon at Venice Beach, according to police.

Video of the assault shows the lifeguard climb down from his tower before he was repeatedly hit and knocked to the ground as several passers-by crowded around. The altercation began after someone flicked a lit cigarette into the lifeguard tower, witnesses told police.

At least one man tried to break up the fight as another was heard shouting “police are coming.” Other lifeguards arrived at the scene during the struggle.

Two men and a woman were arrested in connection to the beating, according to Lt. Daniel Gonzalez of LAPD’s Pacific Division.

Caught on Camera: Venice Pier Lifeguard Attack

Video captured Thursday July 30, 2015 shows an altercation involving a lifeguard at Venice Pier. Three people were arrested in the attack. Audio has been edited due to strong language. Credit: Romy Dee (Published Friday, July 31, 2015)

“It’s just disgusting, really,” said surfer Kim Ternenyi. “It just makes it sad to come here because you’ve got a bunch of silly people doing things that just ruin it for everybody.”

Another witness called it a street brawl with “a bunch of drunken people.” Read the rest of this entry »


Robert Holguin Reports: 14 Suspects in Sexual Assault Investigation at Venice High School – 9 in Custody – 2 Victims are Sudents


Giuseppe Cesari: Perseus and Andromeda

RISDM 57-167

Giuseppe Cesari

Italian, 1568-1640

Perseus and Andromeda, ca. 1592

Oil on slate

RISD Museum


What Is Art For?

CAMERAPHOTO ARTE, VENICE/ART RESOURCE, NY Opening a window onto the Venetian past: Carpaccio’s The Healing of the Madman.

CAMERAPHOTO ARTE, VENICE/ART RESOURCE, NY Opening a window onto the Venetian past: Carpaccio’s The Healing of the Madman.

John Armstrong writes:  For decades, Western culture has been reluctant to assign an inherent value or a purpose to art—even as it continues to hold art in high esteem. Though we no longer seem comfortable saying so, our reverence for art must be founded on a timeless premise: that art is good for us. If we don’t believe this, then our commitment—in money, time, and study—makes little sense. In what way might art be good for us? The answer, I believe, is that art is a therapeutic instrument: its value lies in its capacity to exhort, console, and guide us toward better versions of ourselves and to help us live more flourishing lives, individually and collectively.

Resistance to such a notion is understandable today, since “therapy” has become associated with questionable, or at least unavailing, methods of improving mental health. To say that art is therapeutic is not to suggest that it shares therapy’s methods but rather its underlying ambition: to help us to cope better with existence. While several predominant ways of thinking about art appear to ignore or reject this goal, their ultimate claim is therapeutic as well.

Art’s capacity to shock remains for some a strong source of its contemporary appeal. We are conscious that, individually and collectively, we may grow complacent; art can be valuable when it disrupts or astonishes us. We are particularly in danger of forgetting the artificiality of certain norms. It was once taken for granted, for instance, that women should not be allowed to vote and that the study of ancient Greek should dominate the curricula of English schools. It’s easy now to see that those arrangements were far from inevitable: they were open to change and improvement.

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Egyptian Filmmaker Blasts Muslim Brotherhood

Double Dutch Intl. sold Ibrahim El-Batout's 'Winter of Discontent' to HBO Europe at the Venice market

With the country in turmoil, the Egyptian presence at Venice is small this year. The notable exception being multi-hyphenate Amr Waked, who is on the Lido wearing two hats despite what he claims is the Muslim Brotherhood’s best attempts to keep him home in Cairo.

“They sent a message to the festival organizers here saying that I am a supporter of what they claim is a bloody coup,” alleges Waked, known internationally for thesping turns in “Syriana” and “Salmon Fishing in the Yemen.” He is not only on the Horizons jury but also on the Lido as producer of “The Cat,” screening in the Venice Film Market’s Final Cut workshop.

Read the rest of this entry »