[VIDEO] REWIND: Shocking Blue ‘Venus’

Official Video of “Venus” by Shocking Blue.


[PHOTO] Moon and Venus Meet Over Pond

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Moon and Venus Meet Over Pond by Amazing Sky Photography on Flickr.

 – spacettf

 

 


The Surprisingly Strong Case for Colonizing Venus

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Science fiction writers have come up with a plausible scenario for a floating city above the fiery planet.

For CityLabJames McGirk writes: Why worry about building a colony on Mars when instead you could float one high above the surface of Venus? Science fiction writer Charles Stross recently revived the idea of building a Venutian colony when he suggested, cheekily, that billionaires ought to be compelled to donate to massive humanity-improving projects. He suggested two: a Manhattan Project-like focus on developing commercial nuclear fusion, or the construction of a floating city on Venus.

The second planet from the Sun might seem like a nasty place to build a home, with a surface temperature hot enough to melt lead and an atmosphere so dense it would feel like being submerged beneath 3000 feet of water. But the air on Venus thins out as you rise above the surface and cools considerably; about 30 miles up you hit the sweet spot for human habitation: Mediterranean temperatures and sea-level barometric pressure. If ever there were a place to build a floating city, this would be it.

Believe it or not, a floating city might be a feasible project. Scientist and science fiction author Geoffrey Landis presented a paper called “Colonizing Venus” [PDF] at the Conference on Human Space Exploration, Space Technology & Applications International Forum in Albuquerque, New Mexico back in 2003. Breathable air floats in Venus’s soupy carbon dioxide atmosphere, which means on Venus, a blimp could use air as its lifting gas, the way terrestrial blimps use helium to float in our much thinner atmosphere.

This figure shows the volcanic peak Idunn Mons in the Imdr Regio area of Venus. The topography derives from data obtained by NASA's Magellan spacecraft, with a vertical exageration of 30 times. Radar data (in brown) from Magellan has been draped on top of the topographic data. Bright areas are rough or have steep slopes. Dark areas are smooth. (NASA/JPL/ESA)

This figure shows the volcanic peak Idunn Mons in the Imdr Regio area of Venus. The topography derives from data obtained by NASA’s Magellan spacecraft, with a vertical exageration of 30 times. Radar data (in brown) from Magellan has been draped on top of the topographic data. Bright areas are rough or have steep slopes. Dark areas are smooth. (NASA/JPL/ESA)

A group of science fiction authors and scientists have been discussing the idea on the blog Selenian Boondocks, which founder Jonathan Goff describes as “a blog I founded to discuss space politics, policy, technology, business, and space settlement.” One of the biggest problems with a lunar or Martian colony is that an astronaut’s bones and muscles deteriorate in low gravity. No one knows yet how much gravity a human needs to prevent deterioration, but Venus’s gravity is the closest to Earth’s, at about 9/10ths. Mars only has a third of the gravity that the Earth does, while the moon has a mere sixth. Read the rest of this entry »


Vintage Soviet Sci-Fi Movie Poster ‘First Spaceship on Venus’

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First Spaceship on Venus (Silent Star) (VEB Progress Film-Vertrieb, 1959). Soviet movie poster

In the far distant future of 1985, a multi-national crew rockets out to the planet Venus, only to find its population was long ago wiped out by the misuse of nuclear power. A co-production from East Germany and Poland, this science fiction film was released in the Soviet Union and Soviet bloc First Spaceship on Venuscountries under the translated title Silent Star. It was re-edited and released in the US as First Spaceship on Venus in 1962 by Crown International.

[The DVD – First Spaceship On Venus – at Amazon]

And Internet Movie Database has a photo gallery of other posters and related material.

via Heritage Auctions

spaceexp –  scanzen
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The Original Sin of Global Warming

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 writes:  It might seem strange to say it, but I am a global warming skeptic because of Carl Sagan.

This might seem strange because Sagan was an early promoter of the theory that man-made emissions of carbon dioxide are going to fry the globe. But it’s not so strange when you consider the larger message that made Sagan famous.

As with many people my age, Sagan’s 1980 series “Cosmos,” which aired on public television when I was eleven years old, was my introduction to science, and it changed my life. “Cosmos” shared the latest developments in the sciences of evolution, astronomy, and astrophysics, but its real heart was Sagan’s overview of the history of science and the distinctive ethos behind the scientific method. Sagan returned again and again to one central theme: that the first rule of science is to follow the evidence wherever it leads, regardless of one’s wishes or preconceptions. He spoke eloquently about the Ancient Greek Pythagoreans and their attempt to suppress the facts about “irrational numbers” that didn’t fit their theory. And he spoke admiringly about the 17th-century astronomer Johannes Kepler, who started out pursuing a theory in which the planets move in circular orbits reflecting the ratios of the perfect Pythagorean solids—and ended up being driven by the evidence to reject this theory and discover completely new laws of planetary motion.

I didn’t end up becoming a scientist, but I absorbed Sagan’s basic lesson and have tried my best to adhere to it in my own field: follow the evidence wherever it leads.

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Today in 1974, NASA’s Mariner 10 Mission Took this First Close-Up Photo of Venus

NASA

NASA

Made using an ultraviolet filter in its imaging system, the photo has been color-enhanced to bring out Venus’s cloudy atmosphere as the human eye would see it. Venus is perpetually blanketed by a thick veil of clouds high in carbon dioxide and its surface temperature approaches 900 degrees Fahrenheit.

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The Diva Who’s Never Late For a Performance

Per Liljas writes:  Tupac’s surprise hologram appearance at the Coachella festival 2012 flabbergasted millions, but it was far from the first time a 3-D singer performed in front of a live audience. Hatsune Miku, the singing, blue-haired synthesizer app, has drawn huge Japanese crowds since her first stage performance in 2009. “She” has become so popular that three aluminum plates with her image were attached to the Venus spacecraft explorer Akatsuki. In the summer of 2013, the virtual popstar teamed up with fashion maker Louis Vuitton for a specially created opera called The End, presumably the first opera ever to feature neither human singers nor orchestra.

Source: TIME.com – “7  Computer Animations That Cross Over Into Real Life”