Germany’s ZEIT ONLINE Covers Columbia University’s ‘Mattress Girl’ Rape Hoax Saga

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Read the German version of this text.

Everything depends on just 56 pages: His reputation, his future, his life. The lawsuit “Paul Nungeßer versus Columbia University” starts with the statement: “Paul Nungesser has been an outstanding and talented student at Columbia University. He thrived in his first two years and then became the victim of harassment by another student. Columbia University first became a silent bystander and then turned into an active supporter of a fellow student’s harassment campaing by institutionalizing it and heralding it.”

New York in the spring of 2015. A few days before submitting his lawsuit to a New York district court, Paul Nungeßer walks across the Columbia campus. Stately buildings with columns and inscriptions frame the yard. On the lawns, students play soccer. Others laze in the sunshine with a cup of coffee.

Just like Paul did four years ago. Paul the German highflyer from Berlin. Paul, who attended an international school in Swaziland and loved cycling. Paul the responsible one, who was involved in development projects. And even Paul the feminist, who is now notorious around the world as an alleged rapist. Judged by the public, although he was never proven guilty. He is demanding compensation from the university, but more than anything, he just wants to have a court rule that Columbia’s treatment of him was unfair.

The incident made Emma famous and ruined Paul’s life

Paul points to the building. The library where he used to spend his days and that he now avoids. The student union, where he once worked and was later interrogated. The dorm that was the alleged scene of the crime and he was forced to vacate. He looks around repeatedly. Tomorrow there will be a new demonstration by female activists. “I emailed Columbia to request protection,” says Paul. Read the rest of this entry »


Andy Warhol Screenprint: Vote McGovern, 1972

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Andy Warhol: Vote McGovern, 1972 – screenprint

via Ordinary Finds


A Hand-Cranked Sculpture that Makes a Mean Manhattan

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A hand-cranked sculpture that makes a mean manhattan? Yes please. Come with us inside Instructables’ Kooky Creative Warehouse Workshop.

Pop-Mech


This is Not a Photograph of Morgan Freeman

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No, that’s not a photograph of Morgan Freeman. It’s a painting.

If you are staring at it and you’re still not convinced, watch the video above to see how it was made completely on the iPad using just a finger.

Yes, that ultra-detailed painting was done by a 26-year-old visual artist in Cheshire, England, named Kyle Lambert. With 285,000 brush strokes, Lambert spent over 200 hours working on the finest details in the painting — the hairs in Freeman’s beard, the detail in his lips — with just his fingers. If you’re wondering how he was able to get so precise, he said he “reduced the brush size to a few pixels, pinched to zoom and carefully painted in the fine detail.”

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Classical sculptures dressed as hipsters look contemporary and totally badass

I have just discovered a whole new dimension to classical sculpture. If you dress the sculptures as hipsters it gives them an awesome new look. They become contemporary and totally badass. Needless to say, they look a lot more human. They look like people who we can picture in our lives. This beats Madame Tussauds. I am sold.

More via  Today I Learned Something New


The Decline and Fall of Western Culture in One Photo

The other day I visited The Oakland Museum, and while I wandered through one of its rooms this scene presented itself to me:

Immediately a thought struck me: This is it — the decline and fall of Western culture is encapsulated perfectly in this one scene.

Let me explain.

In the foreground we have a marble sculpture entitled “California Venus,” in a timeless neo-classical style.

It was carved in 1895 by sculptor Rupert Schmid.

In the background, just a few steps away, we have its companion piece, a sculpture entitled “Pink Lady.”

It was created in 1965 by artist Viola Frey.

In just 80 years, the state of sculpture in America went from beautiful and exquisitely refined to ugly, klutzy and incompetent.

I don’t know whether the curators at the Oakland Museum juxtaposed these two pieces intentionally, or if it was just an accident, but either way they deftly summarized everything that went wrong with 20th century art.

Striving for Beauty — or for Ugliness?

The very goal of art changed radically between 1885 and 1965. Back at the end of the 19th century no one yet questioned the assumption that art was an attempt to capture or create beauty. It had been that way for millennia. Little did anyone know that within just a few decades the very philosophy of art would move away from idealization first toward abstraction, then to realism, and finally to grotesquerie.

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