Advertisements

[VIDEO] REASON TV: Whole Foods’ John Mackey: Why Intellectuals Hate Capitalism

They’re jealous, he says, they side with rulers, and they don’t understand how markets work.

 &  “Intellectuals have always disdained commerce” says Whole Foods Market co-founder John Mackey. They “have always sided…with the aristocrats to maintain a society where the businesspeople were kind of kept down.”

More than any other outlet, Whole Foods has reconfigured what and how America eats and the chain’s commitment to high-quality meats, produce, cheeses, and wines is legendary. Since opening his first store in Austin, Texas in 1980, Mackey now oversees operations around the globe and 51YVrzR5lBL._SL250_continues to set the pace for what’s expected in organic and sustainably raised and harvested food.

Check out the book “Conscious Capitalism: Liberating the Heroic Spirit of Business” at Amazon.com]

Because of Whole Foods’ trendy customer base and because Mackey is himself a vegan and champions collaboration between management and workers, it’s easy to mistake Mackey for a progressive left-winger. Indeed, an early version of Jonah Goldberg‘s best-selling 2008 book Liberal Fascism even bore the subtitle “The Totalitarian Temptation from Mussolini to Hillary Clinton and The Totalitarian Temptation from Hegel to Whole Foods.”

[See more at Reason.com]

Yet nothing could be further from the truth—and more distorting of the radical vision of capitalism at the heart of Mackey’s thought. A high-profile critic of the minimum wage, Obamacare, and the regulatory state, Mackey believes that free markets are the best way not only to raise living standards but also to explore new ways of building community and creating meaning for individuals and society.

[Order Jonah Goldberg’s book “Liberal Fascism: The Secret History of the American Left, From Mussolini to the Politics of Meaning”  from Amazon]

At the same time, he challenges all sorts of libertarian dogma, including the notion that publicly traded companies should always seek to exclusively maximize shareholder value. Conscious Capitalism, the book he co-authored with Rajendra Sisodia, lays out a detailed case for Mackey’s vision of a post-industrial capitalism that addresses spiritual desire as much as physial need. Read the rest of this entry »

Advertisements

Whole Foods: America’s Temple of Pseudoscience

whole foods

Why are some kinds of pseudoscience more equal than others?

Note: I go to Whole Foods all the time. Besides the wu-wu health food products (easy to ignore, just walk past the hemp socks, alpaca mittens, re-washable sanitary napkins, and organic teas) they also happen to have the most fabulous meat section, loaded with pork, lamb, beef, sausage, bacon…and their pastries, confections, the mountains of desserts, Whole Foods doesn’t pretend to be anything other than a 21st century high-carb hog heaven.  It’s not a health-food store, it’s an Apocalyptic Temple of Carnivore Decadence.

Also Whole Foods’ founder, John Mackey, isn’t your garden-variety Establishment Liberal Democrat, he’s a firebrand, a government-regulation resisting whacko Libertarian. It’s fair to say Whole Foods‘ contradictions represent American diversity, wishful thinking, and self-delusion as accurately as any corporate consumer experience you can find.

For The Daily BeastMichael Schulson writes:

 If you want to write about spiritually-motivated pseudoscience in America, you head to the Creation Museum in Kentucky. It’s like a Law of Journalism. The museum has inspired hundreds of book chapters and articles (some of them, admittedly, mine) since it opened up in 2007. The place is like media magnet. And our nation’s liberal, coastal journalists are so many piles of iron fillings.

“…a significant portion of what Whole Foods sells is based on simple pseudoscience. And sometimes that can spill over into outright anti-science…”

But you don’t have to schlep all the way to Kentucky in order to visit America’s greatest shrine to pseudoscience. In fact, that shrine is a 15-minute trip away from most American urbanites.

I’m talking, of course, about Whole Foods Market. From the probiotics aisle to the vaguely ridiculous Organic Integrity outreach effort (more on that later), Whole Foods has all the ingredients necessary to give Richard Dawkins nightmares. And if you want a sense of how weird, and how fraught, the relationship between science, politics, and commerce is in our modern world, then there’s really no better place to go. Because anti-science isn’t just a religious, conservative phenomenon—and the way in which it crosses cultural lines can tell us a lot about why places like the Creation Museum inspire so much rage, while places like Whole Foods don’t.

Read the rest of this entry »