Beijing: Perv Seen Fondling Women on Subway [Photos]

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A man has been seen hiding beneath the seats on a subway car and fondling the legs of two women, the Beijing Times reported on Monday.

A passenger surnamed Zhou captured the man on video after boarding the train at Xizhimen station on Line 2 in Beijing.

“I saw that there was something moving under the seats opposite me. After looking closer, I saw that it was actually a man,” said Zhou. “Then he reached out to touch two female passengers’ legs.”

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Ex-Google China Chief Lee Kaifu Under Propagandist Attack

Ex-Google China Chief, Lee Kaifu, 51, was diagnosed with lymphoma in early September and has  since remained in Taiwan to undergo chemotherapy. 

Ex-Google China Chief, Lee Kaifu, 51, was diagnosed with lymphoma in early September and has  since remained in Taiwan to undergo chemotherapy.

In a 9,000-words-piece published on the website of “Party Building,” a magazine that claims to be overseen by China’s Central Propaganda Commission, a self-proclaimed macroeconomics analyst unleashed an all-out attack on ex-Google China chief Lee Kaifu. Titled “Ten Questions for Lee Kaifu,” the article questioned Lee’s work experience and citizenship status, accused him of forging family history, and criticized his public commentaries and political leaning.

It went so far as to query if Lee, a Taiwanese who relinquished American citizenship in 2011, is in fact ill from lymphoma, and if the purpose of his stay in Taiwan is indeed medical treatment. Lee, 51, announced that he was diagnosed with lymphoma in early September and has since withdrawn from work to undergo chemotherapy in Taiwan.

The article was first published last Tuesday but only began to gain traction on Friday, after Chinese news outlets such as Sina.com, South China Morning Post and Xinhuanet.com picked it up. In just one day, the number of search results of “Lee Kaifu and Ten Questions” on Weibo has nearly doubled to more than 130,000. Whereas most Weibo responses stood behind Lee, almost all comments marked “popular” on Sina.com, which may be more strictly censored, supported the article or demanded Lee’s response. As of today, Lee has not made any mention of the article on his Weibo account. Phone calls and an email to spokesperson Wang Chaohui at of Lee’s company went unanswered.

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